Hearing

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Hearing

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Oct 28, 2019 6:44 am

Hi everybody! When someone is unable to hear well, which of the following two sentences is more suitable?

1. He is hard of hearing.
2. He has difficulty hearing.

Thanks a lot!

StevenLoan
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Re: Hearing

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Oct 28, 2019 2:03 pm

Both are fine. You could also say "He has trouble hearing", "He's hearing-impaired" or "He's deaf".

A person who can hear nothing at all can be described as being profoundly deaf.
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Re: Hearing

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Oct 29, 2019 3:54 pm

Erik : Thanks a lot for the sentences you provided. They are really useful.

StevenLoan
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Re: Hearing

Post by BonnieL » Sat Nov 02, 2019 5:13 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
Mon Oct 28, 2019 2:03 pm
Both are fine. You could also say "He has trouble hearing", "He's hearing-impaired" or "He's deaf".

A person who can hear nothing at all can be described as being profoundly deaf.
Sometimes more detail is helpful, especially if the person you're talking with will be talking with the partially deaf person later. My husband & sister are both totally deaf in one ear; can't hear you if you're on one side, but can hear just fine on the other. Unfortunately, for them it's opposite ears. Standing or sitting to the left of my husband is a habit 35 years in the making. My sister's deafness is more recent, so I often have to be reminded to talk to the other ear.
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Re: Hearing

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Nov 03, 2019 2:26 pm

BonnieL : Thanks for your input.

StevenLoan
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