aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Discuss word origins and meanings.

Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:04 am

Bob must have known Miss Pound during his misspent youth.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:22 am

Yeah. He was probably penny wise and Pound foolish.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Meirav Micklem » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:34 pm

I too vote for punonym, Ken.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Jul 16, 2007 1:01 am

Meirav, Well I also like PUNONYM, coined here during the summer of 2007 on Wordwizard.com. Now all I have to do is just keep repeating it everywhere I go, tell my friends, neighbors, relatives, and remote acquaintances to include it in their web postings, regardless of the topic, and then just sit back and let internet propagation take its course and wait for the inevitable calls for the interviews on National Public Radio, etc. as this immensely popular neologism spreads throughout the land . . . . . sigh . . .
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Jul 16, 2007 2:09 am

.. Ken why not start with an entry to the Wiktionary and to Wikipedia ?? .. this time there could be absolutely no question about the veracity of the entry .. I note that it already registers on the Dale-o-meter with 281 gooits ..

.. but alas Ken you have been gazumped on discovering this word ..
We find a similar situation in the Latin literature of Ireland, where play on an author’s name, with recourse to both the Latin and Irish languages, was a common means to give an air of pseudonymity and spurious greater authority to a learned work, while the writer’s identity could be worked out by an insider public. For this Michael Herren (1996: 122) coined the self-referential term “punonym.”
Source: William Sayers: Onomastic Paronomasiain Old Norse-Icelandic:Technique, Context, and Parallels,TijdSchrift voor Skandinavistiek, vol. 27 (2006), nr. 1
.. I may have found the first use of the word .. weeeeeeeeeee !!!

WoZ of Aus 16/07/07

WoZ of Aus 16/07/07
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Jul 16, 2007 2:36 am

Rats!! Foiled again! And to think what might have been. (>:)
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Jul 16, 2007 5:12 am

.. but Ken can you please advise me wotha heck is Onomastic Paronomasiain .. or is that more in Phil's field of play ?? .. *smile* ..

WoZ
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:46 am

We were away in England over the weekend, and during the drive conversation lapsed; in my reverie, I thought “Nom-de-pun”.

I lost track of the lovely Miss Pound many years ago, but I do hope that she maried a Mark or Frank, someone who who would give her a yen for life anyway.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 16, 2007 12:08 pm

But it's a brave fellow who is willing to take a punt on crowning such a drachma queen at the altar.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Tue Jul 17, 2007 8:21 pm

Mrs Malaprop was aptly named when you think about it. Then there were Gummo, Zeppo ...
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jul 19, 2007 5:34 am

Wiz, ONOMASTIC PARONOMASIA(IN) is an extremely rare phrase and, in fact, the only instances of its use that I could find was in the article you cited. However, looking at the meaning of its two component words, ONOMASTIC and PARONOMASIA(IN), individually one can see where it would seem to mean exactly what we have called a PUNONYM – a word play or pun on names.
<2006 “Name Puns: Social Context, Legal Status, Critical Evaluation: It is noteworthy that the device of the hidden name is most frequent in two meta-literary situations that are linked in Icelandic law. Both erotic poems addressed to unmarried women (mansöngvar) and defamatory satiric verse (niovisur) directed at men, with accusations of unmanliness, were legally actionable. . . . It may be the antisocial purposes to which ONOMASTIC PARONOMASIA was put that account for the particular cast given its treatment in treatises on poetics, literature following law.”—‘ONOMASTIC PARONOMASIAIN Paronomasiain Old Norse-Icelandic: Technique, Context, and Parallels,’ by William Sayers in ‘TijdSchrift voor Skandinavistiek, Vol. 27, No. 1>

<2006 “ONOMASTIC PUNS: By far the most popular form of word play is the pun. Linguists who prefer big words call this PARONOMASIA. What it boils down to is a word, phrase, or idiomatic expression with more than one meaning, or two words with the same sound but different meanings. The humor comes when you expect a word to mean something but it turns out unexpectedly to mean something else. Many personal names also lend themselves to puns. The simplest kind is the punning definition: Smithereens = little pieces of someone named Smith, reported by John Bailey in ‘Definitions That May Be Right Or May Not’ in the Oct 31 1953 Saturday Evening Post.”—‘ Word Ways: The Journal of Recreational Linguistics,’ Vol. 37, Issue 2, page 151, 1 May>
The following definitions, may be found in any standard dictionary:

ONOMASTIC adjective [1716]: Of, relating to, or connected with names or naming. [French onomastique, from Greek onomastikos, from onomazein, to name, from onoma, name. See no-men- in Indo-European Roots]
<1851 “The nobles draw only from the most scanty family ONOMASTIC nomenclatures.”—‘The History of Normandy and of England’ by Sir Francis Palgrave, I. page 349>

<1929 “The ONOMASTIC curiosities found in our ‘best’ mediaeval vernacular writers.”—‘Speculum,’ 1, page 232>

<1999 “In their ONOMASTIC vanity, long-distance hauliers tend to name their juggernauts after themselves.”—‘Times,’ 24 September, page 26/5>

<2005 “The term ‘morganatic marriage’ derives from the phrase matrimonium ad morganaticum, which became current in the lexicon of the late Roman Empire. Literally signifying a ‘marriage on the morning gift’ or ‘early morning marriage’, the phrase underwent an ONOMASTIC transformation during the centuries following the fall of the Roman Empire . . .”—‘McGill Law Journal,’ 1 June>

PARONOMASIA noun [[1577]]: 1) Wordplay based on words which sound alike; punning. 2) A pun. [Latin, from Greek paronomasi, from paronomazein, to call by a different name : para-, beside; see para- + onomazein, to name; see onomastic.
<1741 “The PARONOMASIA or Pun, where a Word, like the tongue of a jackdaw, speaks twice as much by being split.”—‘Art of Sinking’ in Popes Works, II. page 211>

<1957 “A chaos of PARONOMASIA, sound-links, ambiguous sense-links, and memory-links very like that of the dream.”—‘Anatomy of Criticism’ by N. Frye, iv. page 272>

<2001 “Dialogues of the Dead itself is one long verbal riddle: a triumph of PARONOMASIA, it is undoubtedly the cleverest and among the most amusing of this year's crime novels-though possibly a tad too clever and a tad too long.”—‘Evening Standard’ (London), 10 December>

<2003 “Also, in his wonderful little book The Meaning of Liff, Douglas Adams defines a grimsby as "a lump of something gristly and foul-tasting concealed in a mouthful of stew or pie". A grimsby, he adds, should either be swallowed manfully or chewed with resolution for up to 20 minutes before being removed carefully into a napkin. I have been furrowing my brow trying to remember the correct literary term for place names such as Grimsby. Onomatopoeia isn't right. PARONOMASIA, the use of similar-sounding words in etymological word-play, comes closer. (There is an example of PARONOMASIA in Romeo and Juliet when the dying Mercutio says: ‘Ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.’)”—‘Telegraph.co.uk,’ 21 December>

<2007 “She had survived six rounds of especially hard words, including ‘PARONOMASIA’ and ‘cotechino.’”—‘South Florida Sun-Sentinel’ (Fort Lauderdale, Florida), 1 June>
(American Heritage Dictionary, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, Oxford English Dictionary, Words on Words by Grambs, and archived sources)
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:12 am

The word the 2003 Telegraph writer was fumbling around for is 'sniglet', meaning "a word created when there seems to be no appropriate word; a made-up word, often humorous" (term invented by Rich Hall). The Douglas Adams sniglets in The Meaning of Liff are all based on place names.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Tony Farg » Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:59 am

I always thought a sniglet was a baby snig.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jul 19, 2007 12:04 pm

No! That's a snigette. It's from the French.
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Re: aptronym / aptonym / euonym / charactonym / label name

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Jul 19, 2007 12:51 pm

.. well there you go I always called them sniglings.. maybe that's just an Aussie thingling ..

WoZ of Aus 19/07/07
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