New and unemployed

Discuss word origins and meanings.
Post Reply

New and unemployed

Post by elky17 » Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:23 pm

Hence my visit here :)

Never realized there were other "wordies" out there, but it seems obvious to me now. I went to wikipedia to try to get a more precise defintion of ennui, since I have it. I was amazed that I was re-directed to boredom. I can tell you it's not boredom or depression as it's being currently used by most Americans and jugheads on Wiki. Or maybe I'm wrong, word interpretation is open to subjectivity right? I'd like to know how the French use it currently, not it's historical roots.

This is driving me nuts right now though.....what's the word when the true (?) correct meaning of a word becomes morphed into something different and it's use becomes widespread and accepted in the nomenclature. I'm not thinking misnomer or colloquial, it's something else...........
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by dalehileman » Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:36 pm

I call it "smearing," though the best "standard" expr I've encountered is "semantic shift". There's still another in the Archives somewhere but I can't remember it

Try Googling as follows:
ennui words origins french
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:39 pm

WW search : smearing revisited

http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewto ... ntic,shift

Welcome elky
angst?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by elky17 » Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:55 pm

Nope, not angst. It's on the tip of my Hippocampus... I can almost hear it in a sentence like...it became _____ial.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by russcable » Thu Feb 22, 2007 5:10 pm

According to the Discussion, the article on Ennui was deleted due copyright violation (after all, what would be the point of writing an original article - it's all so ... useless <sigh>). (^_^)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by JANE DOErell » Thu Feb 22, 2007 6:54 pm

There is a French movie, rent it on DVD, L'Ennui which one review in the New York Times translated as "discontented boredom".

I am old, retired, bored and quite content. Watching the movie I saw a completely different boredom than mine.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by dalehileman » Thu Feb 22, 2007 8:26 pm

gd, thanks for that link but there's still another one, wherein somebody offered another synonm for "semantic shift", unless meantime it has been deleted
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Feb 22, 2007 8:32 pm

Yes, I am sure there is a nother, better one, too.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by dalehileman » Thu Feb 22, 2007 8:41 pm

gd: Yes and I'm sure you're right. "Semantic shift" has always bothered me inasmuch as it seems to imply loss of the original meaning; though Wikipedia's def seem to indicate otherwise
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

New and unemployed

Post by pokoma » Thu Mar 01, 2007 1:50 am

elky17 wrote: Hence my visit here :)

Never realized there were other "wordies" out there, but it seems obvious to me now. I went to wikipedia to try to get a more precise defintion of ennui, since I have it. I was amazed that I was re-directed to boredom. I can tell you it's not boredom or depression as it's being currently used by most Americans and jugheads on Wiki. Or maybe I'm wrong, word interpretation is open to subjectivity right? I'd like to know how the French use it currently, not it's historical roots.

This is driving me nuts right now though.....what's the word when the true (?) correct meaning of a word becomes morphed into something different and it's use becomes widespread and accepted in the nomenclature. I'm not thinking misnomer or colloquial, it's something else...........
"Wordies"? Some of us are strange enough to be called "wordos."

I checked several sources, including The Oxford Companion to the English Language, which gave "semantic change" as equal to "semantic shift." But those only describe a phenomenon. There appears to be no single word for any word that changes meaning. Generalization, specialization, back-formation, euphemism, Janus word, localism, subreption, synecdoche, and toponym are a few types.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply