The Redeemer

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The Redeemer

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Sep 12, 2021 5:21 pm

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Hi guys! This is a renowned statue in Brazil and it's called "Christ The Redeemer statue". I checked the meaning of "Christ" and "The Redeemer" online and they have the same meaning. So why did they put the three words "Christ The Redeemer" next to each other?

Your answers will be greatly appreciated.

StevenLoan
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Re: The Redeemer

Post by BonnieL » Mon Sep 13, 2021 2:08 pm

Christ is from a Greek word meaning "anointed," To be anointed means to be chosen or appointed.
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Re: The Redeemer

Post by Phil White » Mon Sep 13, 2021 3:02 pm

In all Christian traditions, it is believed that all humans are sinful and deserve to be punished in Hell when they die (the notion of "original sin"). But Christians also believe that Christ came to earth to take the punishment due to all humans by dying on the cross. If people believe in Christ, they will be spared the punishment due to them.

In this understanding, Christ "redeemed" (or paid the price for) humans, and is sometimes referred to as "the Redeemer". In the same way, Christ is also referred to as "the Saviour" because he "saved" people from punishment.

The phrase "Christ the Redeemer" is simply using the name and a title that focuses on one aspect of his nature. Other examples would be "Christ the Saviour" or "Christ the Lord".

There are plenty of other examples throughout history of a person being referred to by a name and an additional designation that indicates an aspect of their nature:
Alexander the Great
Peter the Hermit
Ethelred the Unready
Richard the Lionheart
Ming the Merciless
William the Conqueror (also known as "William the Bastard")

All of these are examples of "bynames", although it is relatively rare that a byname becomes so strongly associated with the person that it can be used on its own. "The Saviour" and "the Redeemer" are sometimes used on their own by Christian folks, but the only ones from the short list above that are sometimes used on their own are "the Conqueror" and "the Lionheart".

And, of course, Bonnie is right. The name "Christ" is not a surname as we would understand it nowadays. It was also a byname indicating "the Anointed one". Another common byname used would be "Jesus of Nazareth". You will also occasionally see "the Nazarene" on its own to refer to Christ.
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Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

Re: The Redeemer

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Sep 13, 2021 4:57 pm

BonnieL : Thanks for your answer. Phil White : Thanks a lot for your extremely detailed answer. You and BonnieL have a nice day.

StevenLoan
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Re: The Redeemer

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Sep 14, 2021 12:51 am

In Christianity Father is God. So to use the common expression “God our Father” is redundant. But it is done anyway to produce a stronger more descriptive expression. Same story with the redundant “Christ the Redeemer.”
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Ken Greenwald - September 13, 2021
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Re: The Redeemer

Post by trolley » Tue Sep 14, 2021 1:14 am

"Jesus the Christ" seems appropriate, but underused.
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Re: The Redeemer

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Sep 14, 2021 9:05 am

Ken Greenwald and trolley : Thank you both so much for your answers. Have a good day.

StevenLoan
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