Easy-peasy

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Easy-peasy

Post by Stevenloan » Sat Jul 11, 2020 4:50 pm

Hi everyone! I read a page of a book. The writer wrote that one of 25 ways to praise a student is "Easy-peasy". I Googled the meaning and it means "extremely easy". I think it's not a way to praise a student. If you want to praise a student, you might say "Excellent", "fantastic", or "exceptional job" and so on. Is it correct?

Your answers will be greatly appreciated.

StevenLoan
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Re: Easy-peasy

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 11, 2020 5:13 pm

That depends rather on the exact phrasing and intonation.

"That's easy-peasy!" could be taken to mean "That problem is so easy that any idiot could work it out",

whereas

"For you, that's easy-peasy!" would imply "You're so smart that you made solving that look easy (when other people would have struggled)".

"Easy-peasy" on its own is a useless comment, because it isn't clear whether the speaker's focus is on the problem or the student. If I heard that as a student, I would be asking myself "What is the teacher trying to say?" Especially as it also sounds pretty childish when it comes from the lips of a teacher.

My opinion is that praise expressed as trite formulations like "Excellent!", "Fantastic!", or "Exceptional job!" is all very well as encouraging noises, but these expressions are so commonly used that they are unlikely to be taken seriously by a student.

More importantly, they don't contain any useful information about what exactly it is that is being praised. Was it the effort the student put into solving the problem? The thoroughness of their answer? The thoughtfulness of their analysis? The breadth of scope of the sources they referred to when elaborating their argument? The clarity of their presentation? The inventiveness of their approach?

The more specific the praise is, and the more realistic it is, the more it is likely to mean something to the student. Hyperbolic praise for work that is average or mediocre is useless. It will only cause a student who already knows how good or bad their work is to lose respect for their teacher.
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Re: Easy-peasy

Post by trolley » Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:35 pm

Steve, you may have misinterpreted or misread the sentence. Perhaps the author meant that to praise the student was easy-peasy and was not suggesting you use that phrase as a compliment. By the way, you'll often just hear the second part of that rhyme, by itself, to mean very easy.
"Just click on the file and drag it to the new folder...lemon squeezy"
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Re: Easy-peasy

Post by BonnieL » Sat Jul 11, 2020 8:34 pm

trolley wrote:
Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:35 pm
By the way, you'll often just hear the second part of that rhyme, by itself, to mean very easy.
"Just click on the file and drag it to the new folder...lemon squeezy"
I'm pretty old, but I've never heard "lemon squeezy" before! Is that British, or just something I missed over the years?
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Re: Easy-peasy

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 11, 2020 9:30 pm

It is British, but Trolley is just down the road from you in British Columbia. :)
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Re: Easy-peasy

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:18 am

Erik, trolley and BonnieL : Thank you all so much for your answers. Have a good day.

StevenLoan
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