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House

Posted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 12:11 pm
by Stevenloan
Image

- Hi guys! What do you call this kind of house? They're built next to each other and look very alike.

Your answers will be greatly appreciated.

StevenLoan

Re: House

Posted: Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:25 am
by Erik_Kowal
There are two possible terms that both seem equally valid to me, namely maisonette, and terraced house (in British English) or row house (in American English). In the US it might also be called a town house.

According to this page,
"The term ‘maisonette’ refers to an apartment on two or more storeys of a larger building with its own internal staircase. It is derived from the French ‘maisonnette’, meaning 'a little house'.

In the UK, maisonettes have their own separate entrance, distinguishing them from flats, which are reached through a common entrance. They are often found above shops, with an entrance to the side of the shopfront. Historically, maisonettes have been considered more desirable than flats."
According to this page on the same website (https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/), the English Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill defines terraced houses as
"'a row of adjoining buildings where each building has a wall built at the line of juncture between itself and the adjoining property which provides structural support to itself and a building on the adjoining property."

Re: House

Posted: Thu Mar 05, 2020 3:13 pm
by BonnieL
They look like apartments to me. But I live in a very small town with nothing higher than 2 stories - except the grain elevator. :D

Re: House

Posted: Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:01 pm
by Bobinwales
Just in case anyone gets confused reading this in the future:
Storey - UK English
Story - American English.

In the UK "story" only means a tale.

Re: House

Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2020 5:42 am
by Stevenloan
Erik : Thanks a lot for your answer and the links. BonnieL : Thanks for your input. Bob : Thanks for pointing out the difference between story and storey.

StevenLoan