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the man to supply

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 6:56 am
by azz
We know that Dan is a member of their gang. But is he a hitman?

a. No. Dan is the man to supply illegal material.
b. No. Dan is the man for supplying illegal material.

c. No. Dan is their man to supply illegal material.
d. No. Dan is their man for supplying illegal material.

e. No. Dan is somebody to supply illegal material.
f. No. Dan is somebody for supplying illegal material.


Which of the sentence (a) to (f) are acceptable?

Many thanks.

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 12:49 pm
by JerrySmile
None, IMO.

Instead:

No. Dan is the man responsible for supplying illegal material.
No. Dan is the man in charge of supplying illegal material.
No. Dan is the go-to man for supplying illegal material.
No. Dan is the go-to man for/things bootleg/anything bootleg.

the last being the closest perhaps of the language expected by that crowd, still not the real thing.

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 8:24 pm
by Bobinwales
Really, "go-to man"? That's a new one on me.

I thought, "No. Dan is the man who supplies the illegal stuff".

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 10:00 pm
by Erik_Kowal
It's 'go-to guy' [for X, or in Y situation]. It's an Americanism which means simply 'the person you turn to as your first choice, or by default' [for X, or in Y situation].

Incidentally, no native speaker would ever say 'things bootleg' or 'anything bootleg' unless they were humorously trying to sound like a foreigner, or maybe like an adult trying (but failing) to keep up-to-date with the latest slang.

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2014 3:26 am
by trolley
Dan's the man. Nauma sayin ?

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2014 5:29 am
by JerrySmile
Erik_Kowal wrote: Incidentally, no native speaker would ever say 'things bootleg' or 'anything bootleg' unless they were humorously trying to sound like a foreigner, or maybe like an adult trying (but failing) to keep up-to-date with the latest slang.
Well, these seem native enough:
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New Book of Rock Lists- Page 215
1994 - ‎
Anything bootleg: Don't cheapen your look with peeling letters and crooked logos. If it ain't the real thing, leave it alone. That includes your Black Bart Simpson Tee's and "I Love Rap" hats.
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Like the night (revisited): Bob Dylan and the road to the ...- Page xiii
C. P. Lee - 2004

The origins of GK&TCF (as it came to be known in Dylan circles) as a commercial product are, as with all things bootleg, impossible to pin down, but the story goes that it was made up as a test copy for consideration as a legitimate release and
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Hearings, Reports and Prints of the Joint Economic Committee
United States. Congress. Joint Economic Committee - 1969 - ‎Snippet view - ‎More editions

You begin to avoid people and the "system" and try to do things "bootleg" in order to get the job done. Senator Jordan. How do you suggest that we reward the competent engineers and research men for their efficiency ?
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but any better current slang would be really appreciated.

Re: the man to supply

Posted: Sat Oct 18, 2014 11:13 am
by Erik_Kowal
It appears that I was too hasty with my generalization.

Searching Google for both these terms has led me to conclude that it would have been more accurate to write "The incidence of 'things bootleg' or 'anything bootleg' in the speech of native speakers of English lies somewhere between minuscule and negligible".