How many minutes?

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How many minutes?

Post by STEVENSAKURA » Tue Nov 03, 2009 5:05 am

A: 1) How much money is left on your cell phone / mobile phone?
2) How many minutes do you have on your cell phone / mobile phone?
B: A lot. You can call as much as you like.

- Do these sound natural enough? :)

Thanks a million!

STEVENSAKURA
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Nov 03, 2009 6:18 am

1) would be more likely on a prepaid phone, 2) on a phone with a service agreement.

The usage 'mobile phone' is more common in the United Kingdom, 'cell phone' (or 'cellphone') is more common in the USA. I'm not sure what the most prevalent usage is in other English-speaking countries.
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by russcable » Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:08 am

I'm so argumentative this week... ;-)

If you expect answers like "lots" or "a little", I'll agree with Erik, but if the other person says $6.00 unless you know the details of their plan then the information's not much use, i.e. how many minutes does that amount of money represent.
In terms of etiquette, you may have turned a polite "can you spend some time with me?" into a ruder "how much money will you spend on me?".
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Nov 03, 2009 8:57 am

russcable wrote:I'm so argumentative this week... ;-)
It's your very argumentativeness, Russ, that is such an inseparable part of your, um, charm...

But seriously, your near-unparalleled (and often irritating) ability to nitpick has led to the uncovering and dissection of many an interesting aspect of English usage over the years. On the whole, I don't think I'd have you be any other way. ;-)
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Nov 03, 2009 2:29 pm

I'm not sure what the most prevalent usage is in other English-speaking countries.
.. in this one we have followed the Brits .. or did they follow us ?? .. hmmmm .. anyway we say mobile phone in Aus ..

WoZ texting
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by trolley » Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:37 pm

Here, if you asked the average person, they would say cell phone. Many of the Canadian manufacturers and service providers refer to them as mobile phones, though. The explosion of cell phone use necessitated a special name for the “regular” old phone. For me, it was one of those cases where I hear something for the first time and within a few days realize “everyone” knows about it.
“ I’ll call you after work”
“ OK, but my landline is no longer active”
“Pardon?”
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by dante » Tue Nov 03, 2009 5:08 pm

Hello russcable,
I'm so argumentative this week... ;-)
Are you sure you didn't mean "this year" ?

:)
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by trolley » Tue Nov 03, 2009 5:31 pm

I thought you were rascible.
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Tony Farg » Tue Nov 03, 2009 9:45 pm

Just to add, I think usage in the UK now is just "mobile" alone, or sometimes "phone" alone...the implication being that a real phone is a mobile, and landlines are something from the past.
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by STEVENSAKURA » Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:26 am

Dear friends!

- So are my sentences natural enough to use in daily conversations? :)

Thanks a lot!

STEVENSAKURA
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Nov 04, 2009 7:56 am

Yes.

Was that not clear from our responses?
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by STEVENSAKURA » Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:16 pm

Dear Erik_Kowal and other members!

- It's extremely clear now :) Sorry my English is not so good, so I couldn't understand all of the responses. Thank you all again for your help.

STEVENSAKURA
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Phil White » Wed Nov 04, 2009 9:22 pm

As far as "cell" and "mobile" are concerned, I reckon I hear them both pretty frequently in the UK. Possibly something like 70/30 in favour of "mobile" (which does leave a lot of "cells"). I'm also pretty certain that I rarely hear either followed by "phone", certainly not "mobile phone".
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Re: How many minutes?

Post by Shelley » Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:51 pm

trolley wrote:. . . my landline is no longer active”
“Pardon?”
Ha! I have to laugh, trolley, 'cause I too was brought up short by "landline" the first time I heard it. I dunno . . . I just kept thinking "landshark"!

I have noticed that a few of the younger people I know who have never had "landlines" before are beginning to get them. These are 30-somethings who are becoming parents and suddenly feel the need to have a way to communicate that is somehow more permanent? grounded? concrete? than their frequently unpredictable cellphones. A phone that is connected to a wire in the home represents something larger than just a communication device. I haven't tried to put this in words yet, but I have noticed a little trend among some new parents.

It also might have something to do with the fact that many apartment building's security systems are tied into a phone number and management requires that number to be for a landline phone in the apartment.
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