inchage

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inchage

Post by pokoma » Fri Jul 14, 2006 7:35 pm

English has the words "acreage," "mileage," "yardage," and "footage." I've been wondering, half seriously, if "inchage" has ever been coined to mean an aggregate or collection of or rate in inches. Does the metric system have comparable terms using specific units? "Meters per second," "grams per square centimeter" and such don't count.
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Post by dalehileman » Fri Jul 14, 2006 10:24 pm

Apparently so. Here's one of 2800 Ghits on the expr

Yahoo! Answers - If you have miles/mileage, yards/yardage, feet ...Report Abuse, If you have miles / mileage , yards / yardage , feet / footage , why not inch / inchage ? piperjon2000 5 months ago ...

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1005122901367
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 15, 2006 8:56 am

It's much simpler nowadays to use the generic terms 'area' and 'distance'.

I suspect that 'acreage', 'yardage' etc. came into being because those units of measure were especially important for a particular purpose, e.g. for calculating how much a tenant farmer owed his landlord for the use of a given area of land, or working out the wind-catching area of one of the sails on a frigate. Referring to these units of measurement for the item being measured as acreages or yardages would have been a natural extension of their standard usage. My guess is that not enough things were sold by the inch, rather than by the foot or the yard, for 'inchage' to emerge.

However, all this is just surmise -- perhaps someone with more comprehensive reference resources than I have will be able to provide some concrete information about the history of these terms.

The fact that no metric equivalents of 'acreage', 'footage' etc. exist is probably due in part to the fact that the metric system dates back no further than the French Revolution. (Indeed, the modern set of metric measures was only fully standardised as recently as 1960.) But the crucial factor must be the fact that no major English-speaking country adopted the metric system more than a few decades ago, so it was considered an alien aberration by almost everyone who was not a scientist. It is still not in mainstream use in the USA; even in the UK, where weights and measures are now legally required to be metric, the road system and traffic signage still operate with miles and miles per hour. The experience of English-speaking cultures with metrication is therefore too short for these extensions of usage to have arisen.
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inchage

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sat Jul 15, 2006 8:36 pm

Pam, Dale, and Erik, Surprising to me is that none of these ‘-AGE' terms are that old. The earliest example that I could find for INCHAGE was 1950. The earliest example I found for FOOTAGE was from 1896, for YARDAGE from 1900 (in the common sense), for MILEAGE (in the common sense) from 1847, and for ACREAGE from 1851.

INCHAGE
<1950 "Los Angeles Civic Center recorded .05 inch of rain yesterday, raising the season’s total precipitation INCHAGE to 7.55.”— 'Los Angeles Times,’ 6 February, page 1>

<1965 “Richard A. Lanham seems to give antimetabole [[synonym for chiasmus]] more column INCHAGE than chiasmus in A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms (1968).”— ‘PMLA,’ (Publications of the Modern Language Associations of America), Vol. 105, No. 5, October, page 1128> [[see Wordwizard postingchiasmus]]

<2003 “. . . calculate that, so far, I have increased the cubic INCHAGE of my apartment by eleven thousand three hundred.”– http://www.mcsweeneys.net, 16 December>
FOOTAGE
<1896 “In South Yorkshire, however, the coal field is rented by the acre . . . ‘Sometimes it is take by what we call FOOTAGE’ rent, that is to say, so much per foot, . . .”—‘Journal of the Royal Statistical Society,’ Vol. 52, No. 1, March, page 66>

<1897 “The clerk was instructed to file with the Comptroller, the lease of the rooms now occupied by the Commission; also to ascertain the total front FOOTAGE and total valuation of property . . .”—‘Report of the Atlantic Avenue Commission’ presented by the Borough of Brooklyn, page 63>

<1914 “Misstatement of front FOOTAGE. (Keough v. Meyer, page 111, N.Y. Supplement, page 1)”—‘The Yale Law Journal,’ Vol. 23, No. 4, February, page 345>

<1916 “He visualized a stampede and the probable amount of FOOTAGE it would require.”—‘The Phantom Herd’ by B. M. Bower, ii. page 22> [[first appearance in reference to film]]

<1925 “Last year the square FOOTAGE floor space in new apartment houses contracted . . .”—‘The American Economic Review,’ Vol. 15, No. 1, Supplement, Papers and Proceedings of the Thirty-seventh Annual Meeting, March, page 36>

<1963 “One man sitting down in a thing 3 feet 11 inches by 2 feet 11 inches tends to occupy the bulk of the available square FOOTAGE.”—‘Throw out Two Hands’ by Anthony Smith, i. page 16>>
YARDAGE
<1877 "The amount for YARDAGE . . . includes powder, fuse, and candles furnished by contractors and paid for as labor."—'Statistics of Mines and Mining in the States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains.' by Raymond, page 8> [[the cutting of coal at a fixed rate per yard]]

<1900 “That the courses as measured from end were as represented in YARDAGE.”—‘Referee’ (Cass. Supplement), 23 September, page 1> [
]

<1901 “. . . to increase the YARDAGE and the number of pounds required for a ton [[of coal]] under old rates . . .”—‘Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science,’ Vol. 17, January, page 40>

<1906 Daily News 3 Feb. 8 “The YARDAGE of linen goods exported in 1905 was the largest in any year during the last twenty.”—‘Daily News,’ 3 February, page 8>
MILEAGE
<1724 "The Serjeant at Arms Fees... Taking a Prisoner into his Custody, Seventeen Shillings and six Pence MILEAGE, for each Mile going and coming, Seven pence half penny."—'Ordinance for Regulating & Establishing Fees (Governor of New Jersey), page 7> [[originally U.S. A travelling allowance at a fixed rate per mile]]

<1847 "Patent Mile Index . . . The proprietor has the means of knowing the amount of MILEAGE actually performed."—'Scientific American,' 26 June, page 317/3> [
]

<1850 "Its total MILEAGE, from the commencement of its service to the current date."—'Railway Economics' by D. Lardner, v. page 72>
ACREAGE
<1851 "A premium of five guineas was likewise offered to the farmer who employed the greatest number of ploughboys on his occupation, in proportion to ACREAGE, . . ."—‘European Agriculture and Rural Economy‘ by Henry Colman, page 425>

<1859 “Suitable lands yet to be brought under cultivation may add treble to the present ACREAGE.”–‘Ceylon’ (edition 2) by Sir J. E. Tennent, II. page 235>

<1860 “The tenantry paying a small ACREAGE rate.”—‘The Times,’ 4 January, page 10/6>

<1871 “The cultivable ACREAGE of our country.”—‘Character’ (1876) by Samuel Smiles, ii. page 62>
___________________

Ken G – July 15, 2006
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Post by tony h » Sat Jul 15, 2006 11:26 pm

Being rather fond of the weights and measures with which I grew up, and believing they are an important element of growing a child's mind, I, amongst others, have quiet rebellion against thes metric measures.

You must understand that it is now illeagal to sell in imperial measures; so i ask for a "metric pound of sausages". I have never been questioned on this and have always been given the right quantity.

Just to labour the point : a metric pound = an imperial pound but is in metric.
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I'm puzzled therefore I think.

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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Jul 16, 2006 12:24 am

Tony, a metric pound is 500 grams (versus the imperial pound's 454 grams). So you are being short-changed if they only give you an imperial pound of sausages. Somehow that doesn't seem right. ;-)
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:08 am

"Mileage charts" became rather anonymous as we changed over to metric.
"Secondage" seems to suggest Tolkien's influence.
And "poundage" is variously defined at WordReference.com ; in the sense of "weight expressed in pounds" it's probably out-of-date now. "Stoneage" certainly is.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:43 am

To stay hip, stay clear of Paula Poundstone.
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:54 am

Cool hippage-tip!
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Post by paulwiggins » Sun Jul 30, 2006 5:31 am

Inchage has too many sibilants to fall into popular use one imagines. In relation words such as mileage, the metric advisory boards in New Zealand and Australia recommended in the 1970s they be retained. It might be illegal here to sell sausages by the pound but there is nothing to stop you for asking for them by the pound. Conversely in 1993 Britain I never seemed to encounter much difficulty asking for meat in metric measures.
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