how many of you have read the da vinci code

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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by tony h » Tue May 30, 2006 12:08 pm

The question s is why do people allow themselves to think it is true? Is it the writing? Is it to do with the belif in God? Or what?

After all you don't get people believing in James Bond, Pooh Bear, Startrek or War of The worlds? Or do you? I do occaisionally avoid the cracks in the pavement (sidewalk?)!
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by dalehileman » Tue May 30, 2006 3:51 pm

Ken: Good as roxy's
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Post by dalehileman » Tue May 30, 2006 4:13 pm

tony: You have the wrong conception of God. There's no danger that She will punish you for stepping on the cracks. If you then suffer misfortune, it is entirely at the doing of the Devil. Here's a pertinent comment lifted from another board:

“Pope Benedict XVI....asked God why he remained silent during the ‘unprecedented mass crimes’ of the Holocaust (Pope visits Auschwitz, AP circa May 29)”

I can easily answer that. It is because if She exists, it was She who conferred upon us Free Will. The Race seems to be one of Her special doings, and I can’t imagine why She would have created us if She knew all along what we were going to do

Furthermore, the idea is absurd that matters proceed by Free Will most of the time but that She “comes down” once in a while to confer Her favors upon a special few for no apparent reason, while slaughtering hundreds of thousands of the perfectly innocent in natural disasters

Evidently, it was She who set up the physical constants and established all the Laws Of Physics that made the Big Bang and Evolution possible. From that instant on, it’s clear that She has had a hands-off policy, allowing the Universe to proceed in a kind of fully-automatic mode, except of course for events depending on human intervention of Man, and maybe some of the animals too

If you’re going to have a huge rock orbiting a masssive hydrogen explosion, you should naturally expect a storm or earthquake once in a while

It’s clear that Her only function now is an observer, watching us with a combination of glee and disappointment as we further our creative aims and at the same time murder, cheat, and maim each other


Or do you understand the meaning of the expression different from me

PS: Fellow members of WW can’t help wondering why AP didn’t capitalize "he"
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by Shelley » Wed May 31, 2006 1:44 am

I could not put it down. It's absolutely a page-turner, and little more than that. While it isn’t great literature, the writing is certainly skilled enough to tell a nifty murder mystery. It was fun to figure out the clues (some were a little easy -- but guess what? that made it user-friendly!) What's cool is Dan Brown popularized names, places and dates more people need to know about. If, after having read this book, more people decide to visit Westminster Abby or the Louvre, or examine I.M. Pei’s or Da Vinci's work more closely, then that's all good.
That people expect more, or read more into the book and/or movie is a sign of our times, I guess. That people are so shaken by its implications is . . . hm, bizarre and sad to my mind. I read "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" 20 years ago, and was struck then by the lengths to which people will go to either uphold or tear down other people’s beliefs. When I went to The Da Vinci Code “the movie” recently, I had to wade through a gaggle of protesters who were kneeling on the filthy New York sidewalk praying for my poor lost soul. I guess the appropriate response would have been “why, thank you”.
Sweet dreams are made of this/Who am I to disagree?/You travel the world and the seven seas/Everybody's looking for something . . . -- A. Lennox and D.A. Stewart
So, here's a riddle: who's buried under a small parking lot in The Temple, London?
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed May 31, 2006 2:53 am

Shelley, How about Jimmy Hoffa? (&lt)
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by Shelley » Wed May 31, 2006 1:58 pm

Ha, ha, Ken! Nooo . . . not he. (Not him?)
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by spiritus » Wed May 31, 2006 6:12 pm

Given wrote: i have read the Da Vinci Code but i found it hard to understand...
Pearl, I have not read the Da Vinci Code but I found it hard to understand. So, count your blessings. Know what I mean? You have shoes and I have no feet.
Shelly wrote: While it isn’t great literature, the writing is certainly skilled enough to tell a nifty murder mystery
Shelly, of which literary genre would you consider it to be? Is it a murder detective/mystery, historical fiction, fictional realism (oops---oxymoron), or religious fiction (double oops-redundancy)? Sometimes genres overlap. Maybe there’s some German Bildungsroman ("novel of education" or "novel of formation") feeding the roots of Brown’s book. What’s your thinking on this?
Shelly wrote: Dan Brown popularized names, places and dates more people need to know about. If, after having read this book, more people decide to visit Westminster Abby or the Louvre, or examine I.M. Pei’s or Da Vinci's work more closely, then that's all good.
Good point. Sometimes it's not the journey, but the destination that really matters. 30 years ago I came to know of I.M. Pei while working for a community corporation housed in a former Brooklyn milk bottling plant Pei completely redesigned.

I was ten when I read a single passage in a book stating that a mirror was useful in reading Da Vinci's handwritten notes and journals. "Weird dude", I thought, "Gotta know more 'bout him", I concluded.
Shelly wrote: So, here's a riddle: who's buried under a small parking lot in The Temple, London?
No one we can really know?
I was going to say a Michigan horse farm, but you asked 'who', not 'what'.
Tony wrote: The question s is why do people allow themselves to think it is true? Is it the writing? Is it to do with the belif in God? Or what?
Tony, I deeply, truly, and without question believe it's the "Or what?"
b2bcookies wrote:

I was shocked at how quickly people were ready to believe anything... Just remember when a persons name has been mentioned that actually existed at one time doesn’t make the story a fact, and please don’t read it for the purpose of research...
Very true. What is it about the Bible, Koran, Torah, and Playboy's centerfold that causes folks to do that?
b2bcookies wrote: Then again some are ready to follow any type of religion , sadly enough
That would be me. I am always ready, but never follow through. That is not so sad when you consider the options.
Ken Greenwald wrote:
Pearl, I find that I how receive a book often depends a lot on my mood and what else I have just finished reading. When I read the Da Vinci Code I was ready for some light reading, wasn’t expecting great literature, and so I wasn’t that disappointed. But I didn’t think it was all that good, although it was a page turner, and I guess from its level of popularity I was expecting more than what I got.
Ken,

( I could suggest you read Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco, which will give you more then you expect. But, I expect you’d rather hold your breath until you passed out, rather then take a suggestion from me. So, you being you, and me being me, I'll give you only what you expect.)

I find that how I receive a book often rarely depends a lot on my mood and what else I have just finished reading, but upon whether or not I have had great sex and a very good meal 24 hours prior. (Coded allusions to sex and the last supper unintended.) When I read Da Vinci Code The Holy Bible I was ready for some light reading, wasn’t expecting great literature, and so I wasn’t that disappointed. But I didn’t think it was all that good, although it was a page turner, and I guess from its level of popularity I was expecting more than what I got. Dan Brown is expecting an increase in riches. Sometimes we create what we expect.

On the other hand, soon after making passionate love to my wife and eating her great cooking, I just finished re-reading Palace Walk Great Expectations by Naguib Manfouz Charles Dickens (written in 1860 and forever open to translated interpretations) who has been called the Dickens Manfouz of Egypt Victorian England, and loved it. In addition to being really good literature, I felt it gave me a window decoder for deciphering life in Muslim Victorian England's society (circa 1860 ), which I know more about then I will ever need to, and I am looking forward to reading the next two books in his trilogy English translations of the Gospels’ of Judas and (yet to be 'discovered') Mary Magdalene which will continue the post-modern epistemological breaks and continuous discontinuities of Christianity’s Grand Narrative. First, I have to finish deciphering The Voynich Manuscript. (Only two pages left to do).

So Ken my friend, the differences and similarities between Pip and J.C., Estelle and Mary 2, Brown and Dickens, great lit and bad lit; fact and fiction, sex and food, you and me; are not a matter of complementary, opposites, codes, belief, or skepticism-----but rather our expectations.
”Shadow---A cipher.”
Edgar Allan Poe
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jun 01, 2006 4:29 am

Che, By Jove, I think you’ve got it. Stick to creative writing where your grasp of facts and logical discourse will not be so sorely strained and where what you write, from all indications, will only be bad, not wrong. (<:)
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by spiritus » Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:52 am

Ken, though you insist upon lowering your expectations, take solace in the one fact I do grasp. The dialectic discourse will always provide you the security you seek. If you stay within this context the 'rightness' of what you write will always reflect the thinking of your creative logic.(:-)
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how many of you have read the da vinci code

Post by Ed P » Fri Jun 02, 2006 5:39 pm

Dear b2b cookies, I read the name of the rose from a fiend of mine, she didnt think much of Foucaults pendulum, she was so negative I bought it. ( tells you about what a recalcitrant SOB iam) someone else said it was good stuff, who like myself had been to france, and the places, and factual descriptions are on the ball. There are little details of familiarity, that say this is a true picture.
Unlike being a device, often used in page turners esp US, the "establish i`ve actually been here" paragraph sprinkled around but seperate.
that was an odd book but very enjoyable.
I will check out the davinci code as long as I dont pay any more to his coffers in doing so.

May i recommend something that is as much and more philosophy than nuts and bolts sci fi, reasonably but entertaingly wrtten by a native of oz which i got back from loan last month : The Diaspora: Greg Egan.
Why do i suspect that brothers producing the matrix films skimmed pulp comics, poul anderson, and this?
once you read it you will know.
Bests ed


edit have i mistaken what you have said to be foucaults pendulum rather than da vinci? your entry now seems ambiguous I will still eventually sample DVC
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Sat Jun 03, 2006 6:01 pm

Che, Yes. And you obviously require no such security as evidenced by your lack of embarrassment from the unstructured babble you speak. (<:)
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Post by spiritus » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:04 am

Ken, perhaps you may recall that before babble there was BABEL. Legend has it, that it was not the group structuring of a particular structure that proved problematic. The real crisis lay in the aftermath resulting from their failed expectations. For sometime after that event, each individual assumed that only they were speaking coherently. Slowly they began to intuit, with great embarassment, that it was their understanding that lacked coherency, not their speech. Soon afterwards, all involved lowered their expectations and sheepishly apologized to God for having mistaken languaging for knowing.
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:11 pm

So let us all look to Che’s scribblings as a shining demonstration of one whose languaging could never be mistaken for knowing and whose coherence, if any, he is incapable of expressing. (&lt)
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:52 am

I have been trying to hear in the Spirit of Pentecost, when understanding came to the listeners in a miraculous way.
Please, speak on in the tongues of your native villages, which I take to be the sums of your own experiences.
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Post by spiritus » Wed Jun 07, 2006 3:06 am

Ken Greenwald wrote:
So let us all look to Che’s scribblings as a shining demonstration of one whose languaging could never be mistaken for knowing and whose coherence, if any, he is incapable of expressing. (&lt)
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Ken G – May 6, 2006
Ken, if you don't mind, I will instantly take James' advice and prefer to contemplate yours at length. You'll understand of course, that the truth value I place upon his observation and its greater advisory merit, in contrast to yours, is not personal.

The conclusion that is not derived from its premise just seems more logical to me. (;-)
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