Quite frankly...

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Quite frankly...

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Jan 30, 1999 12:00 am

People always say "quite frankly." But where does this phrase come from, and why frank?? Please give as much info as available. Thanks.
Submitted by Amy Gabert (Oshkosh - U.S.A.)
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Quite frankly...

Post by Jonathon Green » Tue Feb 02, 1999 8:00 am

Frankly, in the meaning 'without concealment, disguise, or reserve; avowedly, openly, plainly' dates to the mid-16C. It comes from 'frank', based in latin 'francus', free, and which means free in a variety of senses, whether as 'not being a slave', 'free from restraint', 'free from obligation', 'free from anxiety', 'liberal, bounteous', 'not practising concealment; ingenuous, open, sincere', of feelings: 'undisguised', of speech: 'candid, outspoken, unreserved'; 'avowed, undisguised; downright.'
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