improving my English

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improving my English

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Nov 26, 2004 4:22 am

What must I be reading in order to improve my written english? On occassion, and my temperament willing, I do pick up the dailies. More frequently, I resort to a thorough _study_ of word meanings from the dictionary. This happens when I come accross a word that is new to my vocabulary from a source such as television or random reading.

So, I do read some stuff, but I am keen on speeding up my progress. What are you guys reading, never to miss a beat?

Also, is it really important to read the newspapers? I find the language in the newspapers a bit modern for my taste, besides finding the news particularly boring and artificial. I've read Shakespeare, Dostoevsky and lots of poetry and seem to chime with the old school english. Regular attendance on online forums has rubbed off some Americanisms too, on my prose. I really want to pick up the best of both the worlds and evolve my own style.

Thanks for reading.
Submitted by Sathyaish Chakravarthy (New Delhi - India)
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improving my English

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Nov 26, 2004 4:36 am

Your written English seems already to be good -- I would have to be very picky to find anything wrong in that posting. If you want to read something theoretical then Fowler's "Modern English Usage" is a classic for those who prefer the old school of English. For general reading perhaps consider one of the more literary periodicals -- The London Review of Books (http://www.lrb.co.uk) which prides itself on a high standard of writing. From a US perspective, the Poynter institute has some useful writing tips such as http://www.poynter.org/content/content_ ... 811#series.

You could also try joining an online writing club, where you can try out your writing style.

Regards,
Reply from Tim Rowe (London - England)
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improving my English

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Nov 26, 2004 4:49 am

My venue is neologisms and catchwords. Thus the newspaper is an excellent source for me exactly because it is "a bit modern" although hardly free of crude grammatical errors--even AP is culpable in this respect

How about magazines. TIME Mag has been criticized for picking up all the latest jargon and catchwords. From my viewpoint, tho, this predeliction is a plus

Readers Digest is good. Especially useful is a feature called Word Power

The Web has many useful blogs, such as this one, if you can tolerate the invective. Phrase Finder is similar to WW; perhaps somewhat less didactic -- dalehileman@verizon.net
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Fri Nov 26, 2004 5:03 am

Ex: SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Dec. 20: ..But other strippers say that by refusing to engage in prostitution, their high-end customers keep coming back and leaving large tips
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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improving my English

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Nov 26, 2004 5:16 am

Dale, That reminds me of the old comment on the occupation of elephant moil (one who performs circumcisions) – Small pay but big tips!

Ken – December 20, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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improving my English

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Nov 26, 2004 5:30 am

Ken, good one
But to get back to Sath's thread; I might add that Google is especailly valuable; while Alltheweb does almost the same sort of work; tho it's not as easy to use, esp because it doesn't have word buttons yet
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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