British Empire, French spellings...

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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 3:27 am

Well whizzed, Wiz! I love the language and it hurts me to hear people respond "Yes I do" to a question like "Have you got a pen?"
Reform...has anyone actually tried to actually "reform" English? I don't know. The most effective way I can think to reform the way people use their language is to provide them with an effortless means of communicating it with each other, particulary in the written form. A method of communicating in writing where they don't have to worry if they can spell words correctly or not, and something which will even help them with their grammar. Guess where I'm heading with this? Yes...right towards the pearly Gates again!
R
Reply from Robert Masters (Asia - Thailand)
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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 3:41 am

Curiously, I found this entry in the archives, dated 1995,one of the first few responses on the site.....

I take it you already know

of tough and bough and cough and dough?

Others may stumble, but not you

on hiccough, thorough, laugh and through.

Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,

to learn of less familiar traps?


Beware of heard, a dreadful word

that looks like beard and sounds like bird,

and dead, it's said like bed, not bead,

for goodness sake, don't call it "deed"!

Watch out for meat and great and threat

(they rhyme with suite and straight and debt).


A moth is not a moth in mother

nor both in bother, broth in brother.

And here is not a match for there

nor dear and fear for bear and pear.

And then there's dose and rose and lose,

just look them up, and goose and choose,

and cork and work and card and ward,

and font and front and word and sword,

and do and go and thwart and cart --

come, come, I've hardly made a start!


A dreadful language? Man alive,

I'd mastered it when I was five!


Response from Ana Soares (Faro - Portugal)
(1995)


Reply from Robert Masters (Asia - Thailand)
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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 3:54 am

WoZ,
Darn, I DID want to argue, cause I was never in that argument when it was au currant. I gather it was not resolved??, and although you weren't so trained, you Are on the side of those who would have disciplined you by rote? I guess what I want to know is whether half of all people WERE so conditioned. I never thought of myself as a "conspiracy nut", but I think I may be coming one.
2k4dec12sun15:15,lneil
Reply from Louis Bussey (Boise - U.S.A.)
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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:07 am

I'm a little late to this, but going back to the orignal question I thought once read that a lot of those american spellings, "color" etc., were really pushed by Noah Webster who wanted to create a stronger american identity. but by the logic of the post, should we change every word that we got from french? that would be a lot of work. should we change the "-ed" past tense b/c we don't pronounce it as a syllable like people used to? it seems like in a given society some things get changed and some don't. i don't think you can make a uniform argument for either modernization or tradition, so might as well take it with a grain of salt.
p.s. i'm living in france now and i think they've kept way to many relics from the past (conjugations, modifying adjectives for gender/quantity,etc.). at some point it's not worth it!

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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:21 am

WoZ: "handicapped by the mirade [sic] of pronunciations" = myriad? As in many?

Louis: "I was never in that argument when it was au currant." = au courant? As in fashionable or relevant?

I don't mean to be a spelling Nazi, just genuinely curious.

NdL 15Dec2004
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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:34 am

Nathan, Yes, sorry for being late. I'm not a good speller in the first place, much less, in french. This was a common word for me a while back but had to be "French" for the proper tang of disdain to it. I don't have an Anglo/French dictionary and curiously I am becoming aware that this List and the other (Online Conversation Device Pages) should have a bridge to other language OCDP,s. AT THIS POINT DIVERGE--
A) We really should, if responding responsibly to Hileman's malapropos, suggest a better word for his need for a single term meaning "Conversation Online Device" ( COD )??
B) Can some one tell us any location where they love their language as much we do ours, but don't think normally in English??? And will tolerate one of us trying to ask a question in a pidgin-effort??
C) I was late responding due to accidentally looking deeper into the question stack. We really need the new one to "bubble up". I also note a silent vote for a time stamp by mimicry
2k4dec19sun17:00,lneil ps,sposedtobeshrtrespons

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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 4:47 am

Kurt Smith,
An example of the kind of thing I need from a French speaker is ( per Col1 " DECAL ") --- What is the french word for 'rubbings'?? Where one chalks a stone cutting and presses paper against it to make an "impression". It is kind of weird to see the French too protective, so that what propogation of their language there is, can not be supported and nourished by rudimentry congress.
2k4dec19sun23:13,lneil

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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 5:01 am

Nathan,
Living in Canada allows one to hear and read a great deal of French. Canadian English will always respect French origins of words. Consider every word in English over two sylables is the same as in French. The languages are linked. As for spelling it is very important in Canada to maintain the French influence on English spelling (I am a poor speller)because of the sensitivity toward our French population. This said,I did some "bar stool research", Canadian "kids" in Nova Scotia have fell victim to the word proccessors spell check and in fact are spelling "Merikan" which tells me this will be difficult for all English speaking countries to protect against. Canada has launched a national lexicon project to establish a solid base and maintain The Oxford Canadian English Dictionary. English is becoming unique to individual English speaking countries and the U.S. is no different than the rest. It bothers other countries only because the U.S. is the largest exporter of culture.

GM
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British Empire, French spellings...

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Dec 15, 2004 5:14 am

okay how did that happen?
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