resignatory

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resignatory

Post by Archived Topic » Thu Dec 02, 2004 6:46 pm

Here is a new word.
Not in any online dictionarys yet.
60 hits in google and I am using it despite only assuming what it means. My bad.
Submitted by Xinch ( - Ireland)
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resignatory

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:01 pm

You are writing a history of recent British Conservative party leaders?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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resignatory

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:15 pm

Harr.
Reply from Xinch ( - Ireland)
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resignatory

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:29 pm

Xinch, There are definitely some folks using this word (an unneeded addition to the English language) on the internet, but in every case that I looked at the adjective RESIGNED (accepting as inevitable; an accepting, unresisting attitude, state, etc.; submission; acquiescence) would have done the job. Sounds like a creation of people trying to sound fancy (the ‘sanitary engineer’ for ‘garbageman’ type of thing).

However, there actually is the word ‘resignatary’ meaning “one in whose favor something is resigned.”
<~1768 “Upon this act a notarial instrument is taken by him in whose favour resignation is made, called the RESIGNATARY.”— ‘An Institute of the Law of Scotland’ by Erskine, II. vii. §18>

<1884 “A conditional resignation . . . is of five kinds, . . . (3) with the right of resumption, if the RESIGNATARY should die before the resigner.”—‘Catholic Dictionary (1897), page 788/1>
(Oxford English Dictionary)
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Ken G – November 4, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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resignatory

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:44 pm

So I would be a winker to be using it.
Similar to using the word "irregardless".

Reply from Xinch ( - Ireland)
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resignatory

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 02, 2004 7:58 pm

Xinch, I agree that it would be akin to using ‘irregardless.’ But I’m curious about this ‘winker’ thing. Off hand, I would think that ‘winker’ might be something one winks about in the sense of giving a signal or suggestion that there is more to it – something is meant beyond what appears on the surface, with the possible implication of ho ho! However, when I looked it up in a few dictionaries, what I found was: 1) one who winks 2) a horse’s blinder 3) eye 4) eyelash 5) the vagina [its supposed resemblance to a vertical ‘eye’].

In what sense was it that you were using ‘winker’ and was it one of, or none of, the above? I’m partial to number 5, but that’s just a personal predilection and has nothing to do with the question at hand. (&lt)
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Ken G – November 8, 2004
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