pronunciation of letter names

If you feel that your question or comment doesn't fit into the categories above, feel free to post it here.
Post Reply

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Topic » Tue Nov 30, 2004 5:34 am

Why does the pronunciation of letter names vary between different English speaking groups:
eg j rhyming with k (England) but j rhyming with i (Scotland)
Submitted by Peter Williams (Clitheroe - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Topic imported and archived

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Nov 30, 2004 5:49 am

Hear Professor Higgin's take on that conundrum in "My Fair Lady!" *G*

Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Nov 30, 2004 6:03 am

Or Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald in "Let's call the whole thing off". Mind you, whoever actually says 'po-TAH-to"?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Nov 30, 2004 6:17 am

Certainly not Gollum.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Nov 30, 2004 6:32 am

I don't think many would agree that Scots speak English! Speaking to an elderly Scotsman years ago, who still said 'slaunt' for 'slant',he explained it thus:
In scottish schools when he was a child, words were spelled out in their component sounds and then pronounced. e.g. "rrr, ar, tay, - rat; fff, ar, tay,-fat". Accounting for rolled 'r's' as well as long 'a's'.
These sounds presumably got identified as names of letters; as in "fff, i, tay, - fit". "eye" being more suitable to the letter y than i. Since j is a modern letter (long i), the Scots pronunciation is probably the older. Incidentally, w being the only letter pronounced with three syllables might conveniently be reduced to 'dub', the printers' use of twin u's or v's being archaic. The English 'double-u' and French 'double-vee' are relics. 'z' was changed by Webster or someone to the American 'zee', whereas everyone in England calls it 'zed' (and formerly 'izzard').
Reply from John Barton (New Plymouth - New Zealand)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

pronunciation of letter names

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Nov 30, 2004 6:46 am

.. they only changed zed (correct) to zee (incorrect) .. *grin* .. so it would rhyme in the common children's ABC song for Sesame Street and thus polluting the minds of generations of young Aussies ..
WoZ of Aus 22/10/04
Reply from Wizard of Oz (Newcastle - Australia)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply