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horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 1:01 am
by Archived Topic
I know about "neigh" and "whinny", but is there a correct term for the noise made by a horse which can fairly accurately be transcribed as "hpfrpfrpfrrrrrrr"? Snort? Grunt?
Submitted by Simon Beck (London - England)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 1:15 am
by Archived Reply
I think 'snort' is about as close as it gets, puny and inadequate though it is as an onomatopoeic term.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 1:29 am
by Archived Reply
A snortatious ululation
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 1:44 am
by Archived Reply
Simon, Here are some websites that may help you 1) understand “What’s My Horse Saying”: http://www.equisearch.com/train/behavprobs/eqsaying934 and 2) classify some ‘horse sounds’ and maybe recognize the one you have posted as falling into a general category, although it may not be named: http://www.horsepresence.com/shop/SoundsHome.html.

Ken – September 26, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 1:58 am
by Archived Reply
Simon, I think what you mean is a 'blustery blow' or just a 'bluster.' I have no reliable sources in written form, and I'm not a horseman, but my sweetheart, who is a native English speaker, a professional writer and a horsewoman, agrees. So I guess I can't be too wrong.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 2:13 am
by Archived Reply
"Hrrrumph" and the posher Southern (English) "Harrrumph" (from the shires?) do give multiple hits on Google, and I think I remember them from children's books. Whether they have the same meaning as "hpfrpfrpfrrrrrrr" is another matter. And Alphorse is different again.

Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)

horse sound

Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 2:27 am
by Archived Reply
Edwin, 'Harrrumph' and other regional variants, when uttered by a horse, are snorts, not blusters. The first section of the 'hpfrpfrpfrrrrrrr' sound quoted by Simon fairly clearly reproduces the very-low-frequency modulation that characterizes a bluster but cannot be heard in a snort. I don't know anything about regional Horsish dialects, though. My aforementioned source of information in matters equine lives in the northeastern Midwest of the USA, in northwestern Lower Michigan, to be precise ;-)
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)