supernatural wolf references

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supernatural wolf references

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Nov 22, 2004 10:51 am

I am trying to research as many wolf based terms there are in supernatural refferences, such as lycan and garou, but I cant seem to find any origins for these words, or true out defenitions. Anyone that can give me these words, or find me other supernatural words for wolfs (such as demon forms of these beast from other cultures). Can anyone help me? Please email me back at EclipsenWolf@netscaoe.com
Submitted by matt daxnn (seattle - U.S.A.)
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supernatural wolf references

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 11:05 am

I have heard strange tales of those who had become what they studied. So Matt, tread carefully – for who knows what evil lurks?

Also, might I suggest that in your studies of this beast that you learn its plural. I hope you know that the werewolf abhors misspellings, particularly about themselves (especially when there is a full moon), and you do have a few to your credit here. So in this instance, if you are approached, I believe that it might be advisable to dispense with the crucifix and hold up your spell checker! It works every time – mostly! (<:)

Ken G – August 25, 2004

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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 11:20 am


Matt, And those small silver spell checkers worn around the neck, that you see around, don’t work – it’s got to be a real spell checker and I’ve heard that a copy of Word in its jewel case with the Microsoft insignia clearly visible usually works well!

Now that we’ve dispensed with the preliminary safety issues, I’ll get right to your questions.

LYCANTHROPE noun: 1) a person affected with lycanthropy – a delusion in which one imagines oneself to be a wolf or other wild animal. 2) a werewolf or alien spirit in the physical form of a bloodthirsty wolf. [1615-25 from Greek ‘lykanthropos,’ wolf-man, equivalent to lyk(os) ‘wolf’ + ‘anthropos,’ man].

And, Matt, be warned, if you meet one, don’t ever pull the indiscretion of calling it a LYCAN to its face – it’s ‘lycanthrope’ to you (although among their friends and relatives ‘lycan’ is O.K.) – they’re very formal and fussy about such familiarities and you don’t want to make a lycanthrope angry (especially when they’re thirsty!)

We’ve got a similar, but slightly different issue with your GAROU. This is the French branch of the LYCAN family (whoops ‘lycantrhope’ family – one can’t be too careful!) and they would be extremely pissed if they ever heard you refer to them as ‘garou,’ since their proper name is ‘loup-garou.’ And be forewarned, whatever you do, don’t every mention French fries and ketchup in the same sentence in their presence! You’d be wise to keep the conversation light and perhaps talk about something like soufflé or foie gras.

LOUP-GAROU (plural is loups-garou) noun: French. A lycanthrope, a werewolf [from Old French ‘leu garoul’ from ‘leu,’ wolf (from Latin ‘lupus’) + ‘garoul, garulf,’ werewolf ]

But Matt, you are playing with fire, so be careful and don’t take any silver spell checkers! (<:)
<1579-80 “Timon surnamed Misanthropus (as who would say LOUP-GAROU [so French in Amyot (1565) I. 136] or the manhater).”—“Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romanes”—translated by North, page 218>

<1584 “LYCANTHROPIA is a disease and not a transformation.”—‘The Discoverie of Witchcraft’ (1886) by R. Scot, V. i. page 73>

<1594 “That malady, which is . . . named by the Græcians . . . LYCANTHROPIE.”—‘De La Primaudaye's French Academie’ by Thomas Bowes, II. page 166>

<1621 LYCANTHROPIA, . . . or Wolf-madness, when men run howling about graves and fields in the night, and will not be persuaded but that they are wolves or some such beasts.”>

<1648 “Dead mens Graves are not secure from these Lycanthropi, these LOU-GAROUS [sic].”—‘ The History of Independency’ by C. Walker, page 130>

<1847 “He told them tales of the LOUP-GAROU in the forest.”—‘ ‘Evangeline,’ I. iii. line 13>

<1939 “The devil, in various forms, and LOUP-GAROUS [sic] were abroad in the land and were a considerable problem.”—‘St. Denis’ by H. M. Miner, vii. page 136>

<1961 “Jerome, certain that the LOUP GAROU had come for him at last, backed closer to the fire.”—‘Buffalo Head’ by R. M. Patterson, ii. page 69>
(Oxford English Dictionary, Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary)
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Ken G – August 25, 2004

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supernatural wolf references

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 11:34 am

Matt .. another beast that you may care to research is the CROCOTTA, the dog-wolf of India .. this gluttonous beast digs up the buried dead and prowls around farms at night .. it can imitate the human voice to lure victims to their death .. the eyes when removed from a slain Crocotta are stripped gems that foretell the future ..
WoZ of Aus. 27/08/04
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 11:49 am

Yes, "wolfs" is/are a schoolboy/girl howler.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 12:03 pm

Not only that, I notice that this posting makes them cur in packs.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 12:17 pm

Matt and Wiz, Here’s some further info on the ‘Crocotta’ and the even badder ‘Leucrocotta.’:

Ctesias, physician to Artaxerxes Mnemon in the fourth century B.C., made use of Persian sources to compile a description of India, a work of incalculable value if we are curious as to how Persians under Artaxerxes Mnemon imagined India. In Chapter 3z, he gives an account of the CYNOLYCUS, or dog-wolf, from which Pliny seems to have evolved his CROCOTTA. Pliny writes (VIII, 30) that the Crocotta is "an animal which looks as though it had been produced by the coupling of the wolf and the dog, for it can break anything with its teeth, and instantly on swallowing it digest it with the stomach . . " He goes on to describe another Indian animal, the LEUCROCOTTA, as follows:

a wild beast of great swiftness, the size of the wild ass, with the legs of a stag, the neck, tail, and breast of a lion, the head of a badger, a cloven hoof, the mouth slit up as far as the ears, and one continuous bone instead of teeth; it is said, too, that this animal can imitate the human voice. Later authorities seem to feel that Pliny's Leucrocotta is a cumbersome blend of the Indian antelope and the hyena. All of these animals Pliny has fit into an Ethiopian landscape, where he also lodges a wild bull with convenient movable horns, a hide as hard as flint, and hair turned contrariwise.

(http://www.hum.au.dk/romansk/borges/vak ... cotta.html)
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Ken G – August 27, 2004

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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 12:32 pm

Ken, my source tells me that the Leucrota (Leucrocuta) is the offspring from the mating of the Crocotta and any other animal .. the beast you mention with the movable horns is listed as the Yale (Eale, Jall) (which might make some men from Harvard a little jealous) .. in British Heraldry the Yale is one of the Queen's Beasts and is featured on the arms of Christ's College, Cambridge .. if wandering the paddocks of Ethiopia one must also watch out for the Catoblepas .. this "docile" bull-like animal has a scaly coat and poisonous eyes that kill simply by looking at its prey .. its noxious breath can also result in death or at the very least blindness and convulsions ..
WoZ of Aus. 30/08/04
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 12:46 pm

One would have thought that the Yale (and the padlocks of Ethiopia) would have been more appropriate on the arms of Caius College.
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