standing on the shoulders of giants

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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Nov 22, 2004 1:15 am

As cited on internet:
Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 1:29 am

If I have seen further it is because I have stood
see further than others
farther than other men
farther than others
If I have seen farther it is by
If I have seen further it is by
If I have seen further [than others]
If I’ve seen further
One can see further by other men
If I have seen farther than Descartes
If I have achieved anything, it is by
If I have seen further than you
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 1:44 am

Dale, So what’s your question?

Ken – August 24, 2004
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 1:58 am

Isaac Newton meets Gertrude Stein.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:13 am

Erik, But do you really think that Stein’s style would be applelicable in the case of Newton – would certainly be applelicable, applelicable, appleicable, that is applelicable, applelicable, that is, appleicable certainly, certainly appleicable?

Ken – August 25, 2004

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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:27 am

Ken: More of a comment on the reliability of Web sources
However, I'd hoped somebody might have the correct version at hand
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:41 am

Dale, Oh! Why didn’t you say so?

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants” – in Isaac Newton’s Letter to Robert Hooke, February 5, 1675 / 1676.

And while we are at it, here is Newton freebie which never ceased to choke me up a bit:

“I do not know what I may appear to the world; but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.” – in “Brewster’s Memoirs of Newton,” volume ii, Chapter xxvii

Ken – August 25, 2004
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 2:56 am

And BTW John Ashcroft lifted some Newton when he waxed elegant: “I do not know what I may appear to the world; but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy peeping into other people’s keyholes and “If I have seen further than others it was because of the Patriot Act!” (<:)
_____________________

Ken G – August 24, 2004
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:10 am

Ken, I think your Stein pastiche certainly deserves some apple laws.
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:25 am

Erik, Yes. There is a certain gravity about it!

Ken – August 25, 2004

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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:39 am

Dale, There is actually more to your question than met my eye. When I gave my previous response, I failed to consult a great little book (if you are into this kind of craziness) On the Shoulders of Giants, (1965) by Robert Merton’s, which still sits on my shelf after nearly 40 years [Note: I regularly attend BA (Biblioholics Anonymous) meetings and am enrolled in a 12-step program, but am not making much progress, although a recent fire did result in an involuntary improvement].

Unbelievably, the subject of the book is the history of the said phrase and where it originally came from (before Newton). Its hard to describe this book, but it is written in the shandean style [‘Tristram Shanty’ (1760-7) by sociologist Laurence Sterne]. The book is a goofy spoof on scholarly research and goes off on all sort of tangents at the drop of a hat, but at the same time it is actually very scholarly itself.

To begin with he states the phrase as being “If I have seen FARTHER,” contradicting the above quote from Newton’s letters that appeared in “Familiar Quotations Bartlett’s” (2002) – so now I don’t know who to believe. But Newton had lousy handwriting and maybe no one can tell if that’s an ‘a’ or a ‘u’ (<:). Nevertheless, I guess I would tend to go with Merton (he is an absolute stickler for detail and accuracy) and say that Newton probably wrote FARTHER (I’m guessing that Merton went back to the original letter and read hit himself).

Incidentally, an original Latin phrase, which predates Newton was “Pigimei Gigantum humeris impositi plusquam ipsi Gigantes vident,” which was translated literally by one source as “Pigmies placed on the shoulders of giants see more than the giants themselves.” Merton, however, for various reasons argues that the original aphorism was “A dwarf standing on the shoulders of a giant may see farther than the giant himself.” And I really can’t recall the details or the logic of all that went on, but that is the subject of this entire book!

Ken – August 25, 2004
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 3:53 am

Newton was misleading the opposition while the patent on his refracting telescope came through. Meanwhile, he discovered gruvity when an upple dropped on his head.
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 4:08 am

On reflection, it was the other sort of telescope. Please forgive my aberration.
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 4:22 am

Uberration.
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standing on the shoulders of giants

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Nov 22, 2004 4:37 am

I love you guys
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