brands used for general items

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brands used for general items

Post by hsargent » Wed May 03, 2006 1:52 pm

When I was a boy, Cold Spot (Sears) and Frigidare were familial names for a refrigerator.

We now say Xerox rather than copy.

In Texas a coke is generalized for any carbonated beverage.

There are probably more.
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brands used for general items

Post by Bobinwales » Wed May 03, 2006 4:36 pm

We use Hoover for a vacuum cleaner, and even as a verb for the act of vacuuming, and Thermos for a vacuum flask. A refrigerator was always a fridge, and a photocopy is a photocopy, neither of those caught on here Harry.

I dare say, now that you have started it examples are going to come thick and fast
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brands used for general items

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed May 03, 2006 6:42 pm

Fast:Velcro, Zipper
Thick:?

Kleenex
Bandaid
Hershey bar
Elmer's
Clorox
Frisbee
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed May 03, 2006 8:48 pm

See discussion at when brand names become generic and brand name replacements, e.g., Kleenex = tissue. A link in the second posting provides a huge list of ‘Current trademarks that are often used generically.
__________________

Ken G – May 3, 2006
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Post by hsargent » Thu May 04, 2006 1:17 pm

I thought Velcro was unique and not a generic.

I also did not know Zipper or Frisbee were one of many of different brands.
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu May 04, 2006 4:30 pm

from http://www.velcro.com/kidzone.html
So, what exactly is "Velcro"? It is actually the name of a group of companies and it is a trademark owned by Velcro Industries, but it is not the hook and loop product itself. This means today, only the Velcro companies make genuine VELCRO® brand hook and loop fasteners, while other companies make hook and loop fasteners.


from http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa082497.htm
The popular 'zipper' name came from the B. F. Goodrich Company, when they decided to use Gideon's fastener on a new type of rubber boots or galoshes and renamed the device the zipper, the name that lasted. Boots and tobacco pouches with a zippered closure were the two chief uses of the zipper during its early years. It took twenty more years to convince the fashion industry to seriously promote the novel closure on garments.

fromhttp://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa980218.htm
Today the fifty year old Frisbee® is owned by Mattel Toy Manufacturers, only one of at least sixty manufacturers of flying discs. Wham-O sold over one hundred million units before the selling the toy to Mattel.
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Post by Debz » Thu May 04, 2006 9:47 pm

"Oleo" for margarine.
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Post by russcable » Thu May 04, 2006 10:53 pm

Debz wrote: "Oleo" for margarine.
Actually, I think the original generic product was oleomargarine and Margarine was a tradename. Oleo is just a shortening. (Pun intended)
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Post by haro » Fri May 05, 2006 12:43 am

I'm not sure if Margarine was used as a tradename. Details of its history can be read here: http://webexhibits.org/butter/margarine-history.html
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Fri May 05, 2006 4:10 am

Hans Joerg, Your suggested article on Margarine answer’s a question that has been in the back of my mind for years. When I was a kid my stepmother was a margarine user (my mother never touched the stuff, she viewed it as a ‘chemical’). My ‘margarine job’ for my stepmother was to transform it from white to yellow. This was done by pressing on and breaking a dye-filled bubble attached to the inside of the transparent plastic bag that the margarine came in, and sitting there kneading the package, usually while watching something like Milton Berle on a Saturday night, until the contents of the package was uniformly yellow, which took some doing.

A question that had crossed my mind was why the hell was I doing this when it could be more easily accomplished in the factory? The answer is now finally clear. The dairy industry had pressured the government into doing everything possible to suppress the competitiveness of margarine. And one of the things they did was to impose a heavy tax (see 1931 quote below) on yellow-colored margarine. White margarine, which was common when I was young (and now I know why), was thought to be less appealing (less butterlike) than something that was dyed yellow to resemble the real McCoy. Ergo, to get around this, the margarine industry realized that their product could be sold at the lower, untaxed price if upon sale it was white, and so they let the consumers break the little bubble of yellow dye and color it themselves at home.

In England at least (see 1888 quotes) the sequence of government-sanctioned names for the product was ‘oleomargarine’, ‘butterine’, and finally ‘margarine.’ When the government has to get involved – even in the naming of a product – one realizes what a serious issue this was to butter producers and the kind of pressure they exerted to suppress this ‘dangerous’ commodity. Also, as far as I can see, margarine was never a trademarked name, although there may have been patents on methods of its production.
<1873 “In all cases the OLEO MARGARINE is separated from the stearine. When it is cold . . . it constitutes . . . a greasy matter of very good taste, and which may replace the butter in the kitchen, where it is employed under the name of ‘margarine.’”—‘U.S. Patent 14601,’ page 2/1>

<1876 “MARGARINE is no novelty; it was brought out two or three years ago in Paris.”—‘World,’ 5, No. 11, page 12>

<1888 “After adopting successively the names ‘OLEOMARGARINE’, ‘BUTTERINE’, and ‘MARGARINE’, Parliament finally, after several struggles, resolved on the last.” —‘Times,’ 3 January, page 4/5>

<1888 “MARGARINE, as we formally record this morning, has begun its actual legislative existence.”—‘Times,’ 3 January, page 9/4>

<1907 “For the purposes of the Sale of Food and Drugs Act and this Act the expression ‘MARGARINE’ shall mean any article of food, whether mixed with butter or not, which resembles butter and is not milk-blended butter.”—‘Act 7 Edward VII c. 21 §13’>

<1931 “The OLEOMARGARINE LAW was amended so as to put all yellow colored margarins under the ten cent per pound tax . . . The new regulations are to be applied because of the recent development of natural colored palm oil margarin.”—‘Science,’ March, page 279/2>
Ken – May 4, 2006
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Post by hsargent » Mon May 08, 2006 2:27 am

Styrofoam is a Dow trade name. This is Polystyrene.
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