open access to OED one week only

If you feel that your question or comment doesn't fit into the categories above, feel free to post it here.

open access to OED one week only

Post by tony h » Sun Apr 16, 2006 9:15 pm

through the BBC's wordhunt programme there is access to the full OED online
http://www.oed.com/bbcwords/

Just thought you might like to know

At least Ken can have a quite week.

:)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

open access to OED one week only

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Apr 17, 2006 3:46 pm

Interesting,
By using this service you agree to be bound by the same terms and conditions of the license as set out in the legal notice for subscribers
As it is the Oxford English, shouldn't "license" be "licence"? Or is "license" a verb in this context?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

open access to OED one week only

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Apr 17, 2006 6:51 pm

licentiousness
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

open access to OED one week only

Post by haro » Mon Apr 17, 2006 7:35 pm

Artistic license.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Hans Joerg Rothenberger
Switzerland

open access to OED one week only

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Apr 17, 2006 7:39 pm

A licence to quill.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

open access to OED one week only

Post by tony h » Mon Apr 17, 2006 8:01 pm

Bob, I have reported your comment to the OED. Maybe the next version will include license as a noun quoting the OED website as the first recorded usage.

lie senseless

Anthony
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

open access to OED one week only

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Apr 17, 2006 9:17 pm

Tony, you are a gentleman. Let’s just sit quietly, and see if they change it.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

open access to OED one week only

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Apr 17, 2006 11:18 pm

.. what nationality was/is the editor who was responsible for that particular stuff-up ?? ..

WoZ
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

open access to OED one week only

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Apr 18, 2006 6:19 am

Clearly the OED had to settle on something: writing 'licence/license' would not only be unwieldy, but to do so would risk giving many readers the impression that the OED editors and publishers had mired themselves in hairsplitting academicism in preference to trying to maintain themselves as leaders in their field.

My guess is that the decision to opt for the American spelling is a commercial one. There are many more educational institutions in the US that will be forking over the subscription fees than there are in Britain, Australia and the remaining countries in which English is an official language, so the spelling has probably been adjusted to match the usage in the OED's primary market.

Anyway, since 'license' is the standard spelling of the noun in both the USA and (I believe) Canada, I feel it is unreasonable to take the OED's publishers to task for using the spelling that prevails there. To criticise them for doing so seems to me to implicitly assume that the English language 'belongs' to the British, Australians etc., whereas of course it 'belongs' equally to anyone who uses it. Although the O in OED stands for Oxford, which is an English university town, it seems to me that the crucial descriptor in the abbreviation is 'English' as in 'the English language wherever it is spoken', and not as in 'the language of England and nowhere else'.

Finally, I am at a loss to understand why the publishers of the OED deserve to be described as a 'bumptious mob', Bob. Could you please explain?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

open access to OED one week only

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:41 am

It was an impression I got from watching "Balderdash and Piffle". The three people they turned out were perfectly reasonable, but I just had this underlying feeling that there was a lot of head patting, and "there, there, there" going on behind the scenes. If you are telling me that that impression is erroneous, then I am more than happy to withdraw the remark, and although I don’t usually edit my posts, I will remove it.

I don't agree with your argument about the spelling of licence. The OED is a British publication, and as such should use British spellings. Or are you saying that we all may as well use American spellings because there are more of them than there are of us, and consequently they have more money?

Sorry Erik, I expect possibly the most erudite dictionary of the language to use the spellings correct in the country in which it is published, in exactly the same way that I wouldn’t I expect Merriam-Webster to use UK spellings.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

open access to OED one week only

Post by tony h » Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:43 am

Eric,
I my interpretation of Bob's comment was that "Licence" can be used as a verb or noun whereas "license" is only a verb according to that great authority the OED.

It seems only reasonable that the OED should practice the English that it itself purveys.

regards
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

open access to OED one week only

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 18, 2006 9:16 am

Google:
2,000,000,000 for license
181,000,000 for licence
869,000 for liscense
629,000 for liscence
Abroad is the way.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

open access to OED one week only

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 18, 2006 9:49 am

James, I'm afraid your Googling is irrelevant here. License is a spelling used in the UK as a verb, licence is the noun. “Because Albert already held a licence, he decided to license his car.” Consequently, a great number of those 2,000,000,000 hits would be correct UK English as well. As for liscense and liscence, I find it amazing that so many people have broken spellchecks!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

open access to OED one week only

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 18, 2006 10:16 am

Bob, thanks, though can Googling anything ever be irrelevant? Who {over 50} would have guest what an amazing tool for thought these jugglers of 0s and 1s would become?
The s vs c issue came up for me just now (the OED doesn't seem to care) as I read in the "Jerusalem Post" that the latest suicide/homocide bombing in Tel Aviv was an act of "self-defence." The unfortunate pun caused me to wonder how close to the fence he was.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

open access to OED one week only

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue Apr 18, 2006 10:42 am

I like the OED.
And though the words seem to come from the fens, evolution has brought me to the place where I could not defend fense.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Post Reply