liquorice

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liquorice

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:06 pm

That's an amazing list, WoZ, and shows like little else could how popular liquorice sweets must be in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands and Belgium, whose products, along with a scattering of British and perhaps American interlopers, appear to be exclusively represented in that set. It must be something to do with the depressive self-punishing tendency that commonly occurs in northern Europe, perhaps aggravated by its long, cold, dark and dreary winters.

There is a profound cleavage in my own family regarding the edibility of the so-called 'saltpastiller' (salt pastilles), which are black, bitter, salty liquorice sweets from Denmark. Worse still are the 'salmiakpastiller' (sal-ammoniac pastilles) that are heavily contaminated with ammonium chloride in order to taint them with an extra-salty tang that reinforces the acrid bitterness which is enough reason in itself to eschew them entirely. It goes without saying that they are among the most disgusting confections you could ever hope not to encounter, but for some inexplicable reason my mother and one of my brothers love them so much that they can eat a whole box in one sitting. They are crazy! It only takes the mastication of one or two of these vile things to stain their mouths completely black with the fetid juices, so that they look as though they have never brushed their teeth in their lives. Fortunately, at such times they no longer smile, being engrossed in a sort of self-absorbed liquorice stupor from which it merely takes them several hours, a cool, dark closet (preferably in an attic at the rear of the house) and a gallon of ice water to recover.

However, should you wish to try them for yourself, I would not want to put you off.
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liquorice

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Feb 13, 2006 9:04 pm

.. russ not sure if they actually colour liquorice .. I found this quote ..
Fresh English Liquorice is bright yellowish brown; the root being soft and pliable has a peculiar earthy odour and a strong characteristic sweet taste.
.. don't know if they are referring to the extract from the plant or the actual plant itself ..

WoZ of Aus 14/02/06 (PS Happy VD .. Valentine's Day that is ....)
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liquorice

Post by Andrew Dalby » Wed Feb 15, 2006 7:07 pm

And where did one find the best licorice 2000 years ago? If anyone wants to know that, just glance at my daily Latin quotation for 9th February (with handy translation attached) here. In modern terms, the places mentioned are in northern and southern Turkey.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/dalby/ephemeris ... menta.html
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Post by russcable » Wed Feb 15, 2006 9:14 pm

Wizard of Oz wrote: .. russ not sure if they actually colour liquorice ..
They probably do color the really black black kind, as I think the really good stuff is more noticeably dark brown especially if you mash it thin.

The red stuff is a completely different thing as it is some sort of cherry or strawberry earwax flavored concoction. Also seen at least one company that makes "twizzler"-shaped candy in about 20 other flavors/colors. Don't remember the brand - it wasn't "Bertie Bott's Every Flavour Liquorice", but I was definitely afraid of getting boogey.
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liquorice

Post by sionnachrua » Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:26 pm

I'm confused. Why has there been no mention of Willie Wonka? In my family we were told that liquorice allsorts were developed as a quick pick-me-up that could be delivered easily by hounds to travelers trapped by avalanches.
Am I the only one who finds many of the items on the earlier list to be slightly obscene-sounding?
kloakslam, pop's pipes, whips, apekoppen, sød, bomber, salmiac logs with salty filling
Don't they all sound like euphemisms for something much nastier? Or am I being overly influenced by the highly shameful fact that I find almost anything can be made to look obscene by writing it in Dutch?

I couldn't agree more. Red licorice is an abomination. There has to be something in Leviticus that identifies it as such.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Feb 19, 2006 11:35 pm

'Kloakslam' certainly is unsavoury. It is Danish for 'sewage slops', though in the same language 'sød' and 'bomber' means respectively 'sweet' and 'bombs'. 'Apekoppen' means 'monkey heads' in Dutch.
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liquorice

Post by sionnachrua » Mon Feb 20, 2006 9:25 am

I had guessed "cloacal slime", which is about the same as sewage slops, when you get right down to it (which I'd prefer not to).
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liquorice

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:48 pm

I hope they put warnings on the wrappers.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Feb 23, 2006 1:55 am

What fun would that be?
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liquorice

Post by p. g. cox » Thu Feb 23, 2006 5:24 am

To quote the famous Eccles (of Goon Show fame). "I like liquorice, my mum says liquorice gives you a good run for your money."
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Post by johnkehoe » Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:54 pm

when I was growing up in Hindley near Wigan,we called liqorice spanish and it was my favourite.In the school playground someone eating spanish would always be approached by somebody without.The formula was always the same but hilarious...longing look,then "want a bit o' spanish?"..."yeh"...."ole"...great laughter.Still makes me laugh.
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Post by Bobinwales » Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:26 pm

So, we have liquorice being called "spanish" in South Wales, Yorkshire and Lancashire, thanks for your memories John, and more?
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Post by johnkehoe » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:16 pm

no more memories of liqorice except pretending to smoke the pipes and cigarettes made from spanish for all of ten seconds before eating them.Here in Brussels we have a good selection but mainly from Holland or Denmark,the Wallonians don't seem to go in for it in a big way.I eat lots of them the salty ones being a favourits although they aren't really salty.Pastis and Pernod also have a discernible liqorice flavour to them..very nice
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Post by Bobinwales » Tue Feb 28, 2006 10:32 am

John you said
johnkehoe wrote: no more memories of liqorice except pretending to smoke the pipes and cigarettes made from spanish
The word "spanish" seemed to trip off your pen there, if you did use the word as a child, are you able to give me an idea of where you were at the time? Thanks
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Post by russcable » Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:32 pm

umm, bob, you replied to John's first post, but did you read it?
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