liquorice

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liquorice

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Feb 09, 2006 12:23 pm

The discussion in the pub last night was on liquorice.

My moiety comes from a family in Pontefract Yorkshire who used to grow the stuff, and she, in common with the rest of us who had our childhoods all over south Wales, called it “Spanish”.

None of us knew why, it may well have emanated from that sort of area, but it has been cultivated in Yorkshire for centuries.

So, question 1, does anyone else know liquorice as “spanish”, and question 2, why do we?
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liquorice

Post by russcable » Thu Feb 09, 2006 3:50 pm

I've never heard it here in the States.
This seems to be a pretty good explanation to the "why" question. http://www.licorice.org/The_Plant/body_the_plant.htm

Edit:
In the interests of "teaching a man to fish" (though in this case, it would seem more on the lines of "teaching my grandmother to suck eggs"), I'll mention that I found this and several other interesting things right away by entering "liquorice spanish" (without the quotes) into Google. The third link that comes up even mentions your whatchamacallit's family's hometown.
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liquorice

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Feb 09, 2006 4:21 pm

Oh good grief! I didn't try Google (obviously), but I spent an hour or so wading through paper and on-line dictionaries.

I shall be starting a new course in the University of the Blindingly Obvious quite soon now!
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liquorice

Post by Shelley » Thu Feb 09, 2006 4:34 pm

Bobinwales, out of curiosity I looked this up on WW resources' M-W dictionary using a different spelling -- LICORICE. I got the following:
Main Entry: licorice
Pronunciation: 'li-k(&-)rish, -k(&-)r&s
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English licorice, from Old French, from Late Latin liquiritia, alteration of Latin glycyrrhiza, from Greek glykyrrhiza, from glykys sweet + rhiza root -- more at DULCET, ROOT
1 a : the dried root of a European leguminous plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra) with pinnate leaves and spikes of blue flowers; also : an extract of this used especially in medicine, liquors, and confectionery b : a candy flavored with licorice
2 : a plant yielding licorice
I imagine the different spellings are a UK/American thing, unless "liquorice" just comes naturally to you! ;-) It also listed "Indian Licorice" and "Rosary Pea", but no "Spanish".

As to your course in the blindingly obvious: where do I sign up?

I read somewhere that licorice is very good for you, however not in large doses as it can cause your heart to stop.
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liquorice

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Thu Feb 09, 2006 5:14 pm

It takes all sorts.
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liquorice

Post by Shelley » Fri Feb 10, 2006 2:01 am

Edwin Ashworth, you are the nonpareil -- nothing less.
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liquorice

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:08 pm

I was with a mix of people from around the UK last night, and put the Spanish question to them. It turned out that only a very few had used the word, but then a number didn't know it was a plant!

Thanks for the suggestion of the American spelling Shelly, I'll spend another happy hour poking around to see what I shall see. In the meantime I'll see you in class.
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liquorice

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:25 pm

I bet they weren't expecting some sort of Spanish Inquisition.
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liquorice

Post by Shelley » Fri Feb 10, 2006 8:14 pm

Nobody does, Edwin.
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liquorice

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:06 am

The Inquisition was a cardinal sin.
The Full Monty.
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liquorice

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Feb 11, 2006 8:33 am

As far as I know, the Monty Cardinal rally is the periodic race for the papacy.
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liquorice

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:33 am

.. ok Bob .. got in touch with my friendly local expert on all things Pontefractian .. she lives just up the way from Ponte Castle and she was immediately aware of Spanish .. here's what she had to say ..
Oh yes ... we called liquorice "Spanish" as kids .. in fact .. everyone over the age of 20 would call it Spanish and not liquorice!

It is not known who brought liquorice to Pontefract, but it was either crusaders returning from their campaigns or more likely Dominican monks in the 14th century who settled at Pontefract Priory close to the Castle. The plant needs deep soil to grow because the roots can run to 4 feet in length, and the soft loam of Pontefract proved to be perfect. They didn't flower in the colder English climate, but that didn't matter because it was the root of the plant that provided what was needed. The sap was extracted from the roots of the plant and used medicinally by the monks along with other herbs for easing coughs and stomach complaints. By 1614 the Extract of Liquorice was being formed into small lozenges and Sir George Saville applied a small stamp to each round 'cake'. This was an early form of what would become the famous Pontefract Cakes, although they were still used as a medicine. Large areas of the town and surrounding areas were growing liquorice. Even the castle yard was turned over to its cultivation after the Civil War. The stamp on each cake was the image of Pontefract Castle.

The last liquorice harvest in Pontefract took place sometime in the 1960s or early 1970s. Well, thats been an eye opener for me. Turns out there wasnt enough home grown liquorice, so a lot was imported firstly from Spain which is the origin of the local nickname for liquorice, 'Spanish', and later from Italy and Turkey

Every year at our Liquorice Festival in town, they sell a set amount of liquorice plants, but they soon sell out. Dad remembers as a child, calling at the herbalist on the way home from school, buying a stick of liquorice root and chewing it .. they are remarkably juicy when you've given it a good chew.
.. so that seems to be the local slant on why it is called Spanish .. she gave me a whole lot more info on liquorice and it makes fascinating reading .. liquorice is one of those plants that has an incredible history and turns up in the most remote and fascinating places ..
We know that the Medical Pontefract Cakes date from at least 1614. Up to the 1960s all Pontefract Cakes where made by hand. A Pontefract Cake maker was known as a Caker or a Thumper. First the large lumps of Liquorice were kneaded and rolled to make them pliable. Then a piece the exact size was pinched off. After flattening each piece by hand, she would then stamp them with a hand stamper. In 1955 a Caker was paid 4 pence a tray, with each tray holding 280 cakes. An experienced Thumper could turn out 30,000 Pontefract Cakes a day.

In 1872 Pontefract became the first town to hold a secret ballot. But it obviously wasn't looked on too highly by some, as instead of the wax seal being that of the Borough of Pontefract, they had used a Pontefract Cake stamp, as pictures  show the emblem of Frank Dunhill's liquorice factory on the top.

Liquorice was found in the tombs of ancient Egyptian Pharaohs.

Native Americans used it to alleviate pain in difficult childbirth

Liquorice has been a mainstay of traditional Chinese Medicine for over 3,000 years.

In Buddhist religion an infusion of the Liquorice root is used to ceremonially bath the statue of the Buddha on the morning of his birthday, the eighth day of the eighth month.  

Liquorice is 50 times sweeter than sugar but only contains 100 calories per ounce and is widely used in the food industry.

Miners sucked Liquorice Wafers whilst down the pit to quench their thirst.

The waste root of Liquorice is crushed and made into chemical wood pulp, pressed into boards and made into boxes; it is also incorporated into Mushroom Pulp.

Liquorice is one of the most effective flavourings in Cigarettes greatly enhancing the quality of the final product. Accordingto the British Association of Tobacco Manufacturers, quality flavourings play a vital role in masking the bad taste of low quality tobacco, thus making it a more pleasurable experience. As Liquorice is an effective expectorant it also enables the lungs to expand more, enabling smokers to inhale more smoke at any one time.

During the WWII women would lick the red Liquorice comforts sweet and rub the red colouring onto their lip as a lipstick substitute.

Liquorice is used by Brewers in Stout, Porter and Beer to give it thickness and blackness.

The juice is a natural antibiotic and is used in ointment for Eczema, Psoriasis, Burns, Boils & Sores.

British Pharmacopoeias do not recognize Russian & Persian Liquorice as suitable for medical purposes.
.. so there you go .. personally I love soft eating liquorice but find the double salted Dutch varieties (Dubbelzoute drop) not to my liking .. also it is funny but I can't eat red liquorice .. just doesn't seem "normal" .. *smile* ..

WoZ of Aus 13/02/06
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liquorice

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:44 am

.. Bob couldn't resist posting this .. got on a roll looking at all things liquorice and found this fascinating >>
As a confection licorice is also available in many forms including from some of our sponsors in the banner advertisements above. Some other types not listed in the image below are: blackjack gum, snaps, bridge mix, pastels, nopjes, fortisal, boerebruintjes, voldrop zachte jubes, voldrop licht, gemengde, zoete munten, carrees, pontefract, dino drop, konfekt, chipurnoi, drop vis, dropvoetjes, volzoet, kugelen, schildpadjes, kleurendrop, apekoppen, veterdrop, sleuteldrop, alfabetdrop, salmiakdrop, heksendrop, mentholdrop, muntdrop, lakrits, salmiakriksen, zaanse drop, broadway licorice rolls, boeriderijdrop, sisu, piratos, jätte nappar, kruisdrop, zoute munten, lakritskulor, poletter, salt , laces, whips, licorice cats, sour licorce (glitter crunch), lakridsmønter, brachs twisters, skole kridt, heksehyl, griotten, rondos, zwart wit rondo's, ama'r stænger, stærke lakridspastiller, lakerol pastilles, honey tops, schaakdrop, salmiakrisken, kinder, alle dropjes, ape drop, mentholkruis, millottes, mokumdrop, dropkoppen, kaneel kussens, geitekeutels, wijnballen, menthol licorice, sød, bomber, citronlakrids, bicos, rullar, nappar, horoscoopdrop, lakritsbåtar, katzen-pfötchen, harlekijntjes, salmiak pastillen, pecto, veilchen pastillen, salzige heringe, hak, trekdrop, valutadrop, dropvisjes, grammofonplattor, salmingar, lakritsi, cocobat, haribat haring drop, dropsiroop, snören, riksen, limburgse cat,boerderi, schuinzoutj, droptella, rockies, verkeersdrop, heksehijl, krepeliendjes, mokum, hakdrop, zachtedrop puntjes, Droppuntjes, dinasaurissen, gapertjes, krepelientjes, dropduimen, duimdrop, briketten, munten, zachte duiten, jujubes, marine knopen, salmiack duiten, schuinen, gapertjes, knoopjes, dubbel zout rond, geléhallon, hallonbåtar, lakritsbåtar, ferraribilar, geleråttor, salmiak duiten, groentjes, konijnenkeutels, suske & wiske, ben hurs, engelse, hoest melange, pectorale, dropsleutels, catherine wheels, dropstaaf, mildzout, schuin, dropruiten, hoesttabletten, lina tins, honing tops, munt drop, black beans, pop's pipes, bull's eyes, bulls eye, bullseyes, verduyn zwart, wit kogels, zachte zaanse, schildpad koppen, rode peertjes, lakrits lentils, briket, droptella, krepeliendjes, freia, dameskra, spederhagl, ferrari, skolekridt liitulaku, skole-kridt, super salmiakki, skipper skra, lakrids-pastiller, super piratos, salt bomber, blue jeans, pernod anis, lakridsekstrakt, polét, ama'r kiks, lakritssnören, kolasnören, jordgubbssnören, salta snören, djungelvrål, gott o blandat, gott & blandat, salt o blandat salt & blandat, colaflaskor, pastellfisk, brikettan, stimorol original sukkerfri, andemad, hurlumhejmix, kloakslam, lossepladsen, mågeklatter, black pantteri mega, salmiakki, super salmiakki, flat licorice bar, fazer licorice stick, abc lakrids, ferskner, grammofonplader, guldbamser, matadormix, pirates, saltbomber, stjernemix, top star mix, vampyrer, familieguf, godt & blandet, lakridskonfekt, chokofanter, heksehyl, hit-mix, kæmpepose, blanding, tv-mix, salt fisk, lakritsstång, coccosstång, mjölkchocko, barntabletter, friskt o blandat friskt & blandat, anise buttermints, bulls eye licorice caramel, salmiakkipastillejä, salmiakkimatto, luomu lakritsi, lakritsimatto, lakritsia lakrits, lakritsipalat, lakritsipatukat, turkish pepper, salmiakkia makumaasta, tervalakritsi sitruunalakritsi, coal scuttles, licorice bullets, salmiakki aakkoset, ballitas, licorice satins, old fashioned licorice tidbits, french petite anisette, jubileum drops, licorette, licorice rockets, domino stones, skolekridt, tyrkisk peber, domino, super piratos, black watch mints, saltbomber, piratos, labre larver, elderado, matador mix, salt pastiller, spjderhagl, dameskraa, konge af danmark, flodetabletter, blue jeans, poletter, pepito, schweizerdrops, fersken, morabon licorice, licorice pencils, free laid back liquorice, midland herbs liquorice root, liquorice comfits, silvana liquorice juice stick, haribo salino, anise balls, coconut rolls (the round black centered licorice allsorts), jelly buttons (the coin beaded aniseed flavored liquorice allsort pieces), katzen ohren by katjes, salta grodor,la vosgienne, teenie beanie, organic licorice luomu lakritsi, knuspersalmis, konsul spezial n, kreidestücke, meeresfrüchte, mumien, pflastersteine, salmix salmiakpastillen, salmix salmiakpastillen zuckerfrei, salz & pfeffer, teerflecken, wikinger-happen, lakritsi gluteiiniton, baraka starmints - licorice starlite, anise bears, farley candy - licorice jelly eggs & , farley candy - licorice jelly eggs, goetze candy - licorice caramel creams, peerless candy, goetze candy - licorice caramel creams, peerless candy - anise squares and midget gems, liquorice perfections, blackcurrent & liquorice, vanilla licorice, RJ's natural herbal liquorice, shrimps, gomballen, hekseyl salty logs, salmiak logs with salty filling, rockies confection filled log, cocobat, haribo matador mix, pingvin salt pastiller, salt pastillur, licorice logs, TV pastilles licorice comfits, salt chalky disks, menthkruis, cendrinca, tics, djungel screams, velamints, licorice choclogs, wrigley PK licorice gum, blackoids du dr. meur, chocolate shoestring licorice, stafetten lakritz-dragees, wallace licorice fruits, licorice whistles, ruitjes, xylitol salmiakki, boston blackie licorice taffy, licorice fudge, free laidback liquorice, musta pantteri, van slooten lakrids figurer, black pharaoh, great skott licorice twists and caramelle gommose alla liquirizia, Cavendish & Harvey, and Twizzlers Twist-n-fill.
.. I have absolutely no idea what they are talking about most of the time but they all sound edible .. don't they ?? .. could just see you walking into the corner shop in Pontefract and saying, "I'll have pennys worth of xylitol salmiakki, tuppence of stafetten lakritz-dragees, two cocobats and harpenny of licorice caramel creams." ..

WoZ of Aus 13/02/06
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liquorice

Post by russcable » Mon Feb 13, 2006 4:58 pm

Wizard of Oz wrote:... but I can't eat red liquorice .. just doesn't seem "normal" .. *smile* ..
"Red licorice" is one of my pet peeves. None of the brands I've checked that make this stuff have the word licorice on the label of any non-licorice-flavored licorice-shaped candies (Twizzlers, Red Vines, a few others) although Red Vines does call their actual licorice "Red Vines Black Licorice" (a redundant oxymoron?). I've also noticed that the people who insist on calling the red stuff "licorice" are usually the ones who hate real licorice.
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Post by haro » Mon Feb 13, 2006 5:30 pm

WoZ, I have to add Bärendreck to your list, a popular word for pure licorice bars in Alemannic areas (southwestern Germany, northern Switzerland and western Austria). It means bear crap and stands for the stuff that lifts all loose tooth fillings because it's very hard and very sticky.
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