Word Relationships

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Word Relationships

Post by blu10 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 12:13 am

Can someone help me out? I'm looking for a relationship word for the bottom set of words. It is probably very obvious, but I am not seeing it. This is my first time visiting and posting on this site. I hope I am using it correctly.

house;bath;watching;brain The answer is: bird (bird house, bird bath, bird watching & bird brain)

milk;dog;out;down What is the relationship word?

Thanks for any help you can give.

--blu10
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Post by dalehileman » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:45 pm

Put the milk out
Put the dog out
The dog will down the milk
Put the dog down

Just kidding. But I just wanted you know somebody cares
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:59 pm

Blu, This is kind of lame, but I suppose it might be better than a kick in the teeth – maybe!:

WHITE MILK – as opposed to chocolate milk, and this one is fairly common.

WHITE DOG – doesn’t mean much in particular to me, but does produce ~ 763,000 Google hits, 94,000 of which are associated with ‘white dog’ cafes, so it must have some significance to some folks

WHITE OUT– a cold weather condition

WHITEOUT– a correction fluid for printed matter

WHITE DOWN – of geese, chicks, etc, and the goose down used in pillows, comforters, etc. – produced ~ 136,000 Google hits versus ~ 35,000 for ‘gray/grey down.’
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Ken G – September 19, 2005
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Post by mike2005 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 7:20 pm

How about HOUSE

Milk House
Dog House
Out House
Down House - as in downstairs

WEBSTERS Third New International Dictionary
Mike
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Sep 19, 2005 7:48 pm

Mike, Nice work. I do prefer yours since they have the advantage of all appearing in the dictionary as phrases, although ‘down-house,’ being British dialect, is a bit obscure to some English speakers.
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Ken G – September 19, 2005
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Sep 19, 2005 8:17 pm

Including some from England. :-)
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Post by dalehileman » Tue Sep 20, 2005 12:21 am

Milk run
Dog run
Run out
Run down
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Post by blu10 » Tue Sep 20, 2005 7:32 am

Thanks for the quick responses everyone! I decided to go with "churn" for
milk churn, dog churn (yes, there was such a device), churn out and churn down
(it came up with some google hits).

Reportedly, the accepted response was "shake" or "run".

Thanks again for your input!
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Post by Bobinwales » Tue Sep 20, 2005 8:14 am

I thought of "shake", but wot the el is a "dogshake"?
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

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Post by dalehileman » Tue Sep 20, 2005 3:38 pm

Bob: Almost 10,000 hits on "shakedog"
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Post by Bobinwales » Tue Sep 20, 2005 4:19 pm

OK... but not a word I use, or hear daily... possibly once in an entire lifetime now that I have read this thread.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

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Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Sep 21, 2005 4:11 am

Does a shake dog rank above or below a King Charles spaniel?
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Word Relationships

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Sep 21, 2005 6:00 am

Bob and Dale, In a Google search DOGSHAKE produced a total of 80 hits. However, DOG SHAKE did produce ~37,000 hits. However, eliminating references to a song by the name of ‘Shake Dog Shake,’ cut that number down by 95% to about 2000. And if we eliminate the ‘dog shake’ in the phrase ‘dog shake off,’ we are down to 953 hits. And if we notice in those that many are in sentences that are not using ‘dog shake’ as an expression (e.g. “If you are a red dog, shake your tail,” “Does your dog shake hands with everyone but you?,” “Do not hit your dog. Shake his collar, or pull his leash instead,” etc. etc.), in the end, we are probably down to a few hundred genuine DOG SHAKES. But, that is still not a totally insignificant number and the phrase definitely does exist, but not in the 37,000s proportions.

SHAKEDOG produced about 9900 Google hits and after subtracting out references to the song ‘Shake Dog Shake,’ etc. I was still left with ~9000 hits. If one looks through those hits it is clear that most of them refer to the username/handle SHAKEDOG. My guess as to why this became a popular username is again that it is related to the popular 1984 song SHAKE DOG SHAKE (and ‘shakedog’ is the dog that does the shaking) by the popular band CURE of the 1970s and 1980s.

As far as I could determine, DOG SHAKE,DOGSHAKE, SHAKE DOG, and SHAKEDOG have not made it into any of the dictionaries (standard or slang) – at least the ones that I checked – but I can certainly see the appeal of this expression with the strong visual of the dog trying to shake itself dry. However, I don’t see a lot of general applications for its use, other than as a cutesy username, so I fear that perhaps it may never make it into those hallowed tomes! (>:)

Ken – September 20, 2005
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Post by dalehileman » Fri Sep 30, 2005 6:00 pm

Ken thanks
I am considering it for my own hallowed tome
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