Is dorknoid a real word?

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Is dorknoid a real word?

Post by chavagrace » Tue May 17, 2005 6:53 pm

One of my family members called her husband a dorknoid after he refused to stop for gas when the tank was below the empty sign. Is this really a word or did she make it up in frustration?
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Is dorknoid a real word?

Post by mongrowl » Tue May 17, 2005 7:28 pm

per OneLook-----
Quick definitions (-oid)
# () A suffix or combining form meaning like, resembling, in the form of; as in anthropoid, asteroid, spheroid.
So she didn't mean that he was a DORK, but just resembled one.
Lneil
p.s.-- Technically, the (n) on the end of (dork), alludes clearly to some other similar word ending in an (N), presumably 'paranoid','cretin', drunken?
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Is dorknoid a real word?

Post by haro » Wed May 18, 2005 12:13 am

Correct. '-eides' is a Greek suffix meaning '-like.' 'Ánthropos' = 'human' -> 'anthropoeidés' = 'manlike'; 'ástron' (occasionally 'astérion') = 'star' -> 'asteroeidés' = 'like a star'; 'sphaíra' = 'ball', 'sphere' -> 'sphairoeidés' = ball-shaped. Please note that in Greek the '-o-' is not part of the suffix but used to connect the stem to the suffix.

As far as I can see, for a long time, '-oid' was used only in terms in which the stem was Greek or, in much rarer cases, Latin. However, these days terms like 'parkinsonoid' are becoming more and more common.

Quite obviously the insertion of the '-n-' in 'dorknoid' was caused by ignorance of the way such words are generated.
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Is dorknoid a real word?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed May 18, 2005 4:34 am

The only word I know of that ends in '-oia' other than 'paranoia' is 'sequoia', which of course is not a word of Greek origin but derives from a Cherokee personal name. Nevertheless, apart from requiring a diaeresis to clarify the pronunciation, a case could be made for the adjective 'sequoïd' (pronounced 'seKWOYid') rather than the inelegant 'sequoia-like' which otherwise has to be resorted to. Oh well.
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