skinned alive

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skinned alive

Post by Bobinwales » Tue May 10, 2005 8:09 am

Most of out public libraries now have computers for research use now, is it the same your side?

It does strike me that it would save a lot of time and effort if the character were to be boiled, it's equally horrible but a lot easier to picture. Splash - Arrghh!
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skinned alive

Post by Phil White » Tue May 10, 2005 8:41 am

Perhaps he should be condemned to recovering virally infected computers. On the whole, I reckon skinning alive would be a mild punishment in comparison.
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skinned alive

Post by William Barclay » Tue May 10, 2005 10:32 am

This all sounds rather sick, but if you insist…

I happen to know that Romanian gypsies have a habit of skinning chickens, sheep and goats (perhaps other livestock) alive. They claim it ensure that the meat remains tender and the skin unblemished. I could agree with the latter, but given that the animal is most likely in considerable distress, I have doubts about the former.

The gypsy method for skinning these animals (alive) is rather strange, to say the least. They cut a small hole in the side of the anus so as to expose a space between the skin and the muscle or flesh. Why the anus? I assume it is because that is the one part of the skin that they are most prepared to risk damaging.

They then blow air into the space, thus forcing the skin to separate from the flesh. The animal starts to blow up like a balloon. While it appears that they are blowing into the animal’s anus, a rather outlandish scene, be assured they are not.

Chickens blow up quite easily, while sheep and goats have to be coaxed along by slapping the skin with a small branch or whip which helps to separate the skin from the flesh. The skin can be separated everywhere except the head, feet and tail. It is at this point that the animal may have its throat slit before the final skinning. Chickens, however, are sometimes subjected to having the loose skin pulled over their heads and then left to stand around (naked) until being butchered.

I have personally witnessed this process being applied to goats and sheep by nomads in the Red Sea Hills of Sudan, but they, unlike the gypsies, kill the animal (cutting its throat) before the blowing begins. Their intension is to keep the skin in perfect condition so that it can be used as a water bag or sold as pelts.

Now how about that as a twist in that story you’re writing?
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skinned alive

Post by renaissance1 » Tue May 10, 2005 6:51 pm

Bob, Nah, boiling won't work. I wanted something the American Indians were infamous for. But anyway, I've decided to change directions and allow him to live. Say, how much garlic would one use? Cheers
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skinned alive

Post by renaissance1 » Wed May 11, 2005 12:34 am

William B.: fascinating! I can't use it, but thank you for sharing the experience with me.
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skinned alive

Post by Jim Ransom » Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:25 pm

I don't know if this was a serious enquiry, but if it was, then you will find a detailed description in one of the finest books to have been written recently, Murakami's The Wind-up Bird Chronicle. For some more information about the writer:
http://www.murakami.ch/hm/bibliography/ ... _bird.html
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skinned alive

Post by renaissance1 » Wed Jun 01, 2005 6:47 pm

to Jim Ransom,

Yes, Jim. It was a serious inquiry for a book I'm writing. Since asking I've decided to use a different method. Thank you for the tip on Murakami's book.
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skinned alive

Post by spiritus » Wed Jun 08, 2005 2:12 am

Dale,

I like your second sentence.

"Let he who is without skin, surf the first site."
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