Search found 8319 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Sun Jun 21, 2020 8:28 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Sand?
Replies: 5
Views: 2739

Re: Sand?

Bobinwales wrote:
Sun Jun 21, 2020 7:56 pm
But, isn't the German word for "sand"... "Sand"?
Yes.

It's possible that erobins12 has mixed up "deutsch" and "Dutch". :lol: The Dutch word for sand is zand, but as you rightly point out, Bob, in German it is sand.
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Jun 18, 2020 5:18 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: strikingly
Replies: 2
Views: 2193

Re: strikingly

I agree with you about all the sentences, except that in my opinion it is No. 6 that sounds strange, not No. 5.
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Jun 17, 2020 4:04 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Female hierophant ?
Replies: 5
Views: 4484

Re: Female hierophant ?

Hierophant = Pachyderm matriarch.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Jun 15, 2020 2:51 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Mind the information gap
Replies: 0
Views: 1337

Mind the information gap

I read this on Quora just now and was rather tickled by it: ---------- I was coming back from France on a Eurostar train many years ago shortly after the service started. When you you get to the French side they announce ‘Mesdames et messieurs, nous avons maintenant atteint notre vitesse maximale de...
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Jun 14, 2020 4:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Jeans' cuff
Replies: 2
Views: 1954

Re: Jeans' cuff

Both are fine, in my opinion, except for the typo in 2) ("forgot the"). You could also use "turn down" as well as "pull down" and "let down". The preposition is separable in all those phrasal verbs, and indeed you have treated it as such in 2). The apostrophe after "jeans" is optional, as in speech ...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Jun 12, 2020 4:45 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: perseverate
Replies: 2
Views: 1623

Re: perseverate

Some Slavic languages have verbs for common actions (e.g. the verb meaning "to go") which have a frequentative aspect, meaning they indicate that the action in question is repeated or takes place on a habitual or persistent basis. (In English, the same idea is generally conveyed by qualifying the ve...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Jun 12, 2020 4:22 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Pass and Decline
Replies: 2
Views: 1780

Re: Pass and Decline

"I'm afraid I'll have to decline" is perfectly fine, but it's a super-polite formulation. In this instance the politeness would be unnecessary, because the speaker is reporting what she would do in a hypothetical situation, not actually declining a potential date or hook-up to their face. In convers...
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Jun 09, 2020 5:04 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: every member's wallet
Replies: 2
Views: 1623

Re: every member's wallet

What Trolley said.
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Jun 09, 2020 4:30 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: every member
Replies: 1
Views: 1429

Re: every member

Pretty much the same meaning, except for the possible suggestion that with b), the members were targeted individually by the thieves (as opposed to the theft being purely opportunistic).
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Jun 07, 2020 10:58 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Laundry
Replies: 3
Views: 1838

Re: Laundry

I have to disagree with the banner. It's also a great idea to keep the pigments separate when painting a picture or redecorating a building.
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Jun 03, 2020 5:24 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do Covid
Replies: 2
Views: 1661

Re: Do Covid

My guess is that it is a reference either to the inconsistency and lack of clarity regarding the easing of so-called "social distancing" measures against Covid-19 around the world, or to the mass protests against police brutality sparked by the murder of George Floyd that are currently taking place ...
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Jun 03, 2020 3:22 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: there were live rounds in the rifle
Replies: 1
Views: 1589

Re: there were live rounds in the rifle

I could imagine 1) as part of a summary of preparations for a military engagement: "The sniper took up his position at the window and placed the stock of his long-barrelled gun against his shoulder. He was in a good mood: he had just enjoyed a large bowl of goulash, and that morning his commanding o...
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Jun 03, 2020 3:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: anyone/just anyone
Replies: 1
Views: 1530

Re: anyone/just anyone

I don't think a native speaker of English would be very likely to utter 1). They would be more likely to say something like "How would you feel if your dog attacked {someone / somebody}?"

To my mind, 2) carries the meaning "How would you feel if your dog attacked people at random?"
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Jun 02, 2020 5:30 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: are winning
Replies: 1
Views: 1517

Re: are winning

It's clearly present continuous, as the credit card companies are both already undertaking this practice and making money out of it ("winning").
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Jun 02, 2020 2:31 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: dancing acrobatically
Replies: 1
Views: 1556

Re: dancing acrobatically

No. If that was what you meant, you would have to write something like "I very much enjoy [watching] acrobatic dancing", where the phrase "acrobatic dancing" refers unambiguously to the phenomenon of the dance rather than to performing it. Note that my version requires the inclusion of "watching" to...