Search found 8472 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 21, 2020 6:12 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: hospital corners
Replies: 18
Views: 5877

Re: hospital corners

Here's a handy how-to guide on folding hospital corners: https://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Hospital-Corner

Personally, I feel that life's too short for this kind of obsessiveness, though in a hotel, hospital or barracks there is arguably some point to it.
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 21, 2020 4:41 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Rudi Giuliani
Replies: 1
Views: 1858

Re: Rudi Giuliani

Like his boss Donald Trump, Giuliani's dyeing to run again for office -- hopefully with similar success.
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 21, 2020 4:00 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Come close
Replies: 3
Views: 3242

Re: Come close

{Nothing could / There's nothing to} touch Trolley's response.
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Nov 20, 2020 6:07 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Run a red light
Replies: 5
Views: 3500

Re: Run a red light

"Were you trying to kill us both, you ******* *****!?"
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Nov 19, 2020 8:28 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: too good
Replies: 5
Views: 3723

Re: too good

In my observation, the "of a" construction is prevalent in North America, and the naked "a" construction is more common here in the UK. But these are norms with exceptions, so as far as I'm concerned, have at it whichever way you wanna say it. :wink:
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:44 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: let down
Replies: 1
Views: 2605

Re: let down

General expectations can be let down as well. It's not just failures to keep promises that can lead to let-downs.

Both versions sound fine to me; 1) is more colloquial. No discernible difference in meaning unless the speaker of 1) actually lost money, or a bet, as a result of the losing score.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:03 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: any other man
Replies: 1
Views: 2600

Re: any other man

In both cases, the logic of the construction says yes. However, in practice people often speak without wording their utterances too carefully, in a manner that makes them sound as though they are saying the opposite of what they actually mean. (For instance, I regularly hear "It's impossible to unde...
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Roger
Replies: 6
Views: 4454

Re: Roger

Yes, sometimes, but usually with older people. They are more likely to understand the reference than the generations that have grown up with the internet.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:19 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The door of
Replies: 2
Views: 3022

Re: The door of

I don't think the metaphor of the door is very effective in this context.

"During childbirth, the line between successfully giving birth and dying is a narrow one."

It is not necessary to specify the mother with this formulation, because it is obvious that that is who is implied.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Nov 09, 2020 7:52 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Now and again.
Replies: 3
Views: 2672

Re: Now and again.

Naturally so, Phil: Bob is a groan-up.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:45 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: My legacy
Replies: 0
Views: 2128

My legacy

I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Point straight at
Replies: 3
Views: 3547

Re: Point straight at

I would suggest

"I loathe having a stationary pedestal fan with the air blowing straight at me. I always turn it away from me so that {I'm / I can be} comfortable."
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 07, 2020 3:35 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Excuses, excuses...
Replies: 0
Views: 2248

Excuses, excuses...

A speeding businessman tried to outrun a cop. He soon came to his senses and stopped. The cop said, “Look, I’m just going off duty. If you can give me an excuse I haven’t heard before, I’ll forget about it.” “It’s like this, officer. Last week, my wife ran off with a policeman. I thought you were br...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Nov 07, 2020 3:18 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: as rapidly as
Replies: 1
Views: 3008

Re: as rapidly as

In a) and b), "as" is being used in the sense of "given that", e.g.:

Given that they are moving [so] rapidly, ....

Given that John hit Henry [so] hard, ...


"As" is a word with many applications and nuances of meaning.
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Nov 06, 2020 8:02 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Muffler vs Scarf
Replies: 3
Views: 3560

Re: Muffler vs Scarf

To me, muffler in this context is synonymous with scarf if we disregard the fact that it is an Americanism and therefore is not universally understood by speakers of English. There is no difference in design.