Search found 82 matches

by John Barton
Sat Jan 29, 2005 7:44 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cartoon jargon
Replies: 5
Views: 4348

cartoon jargon

Thanks, Erik - yes. I meant that everyone has seen cartoons with vertical lines ending in a dust cloud, to show something has rushed by, but are NOT aware they can be described succinctly as hites and a briffit. Etc.
by John Barton
Fri Jan 28, 2005 8:49 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: patteran / patrin
Replies: 4
Views: 3037

patteran / patrin

Thanks all - interesting. It's significant that Enid Blyton used the word, since she assiduously avoided enlarging childrens' vocabularies (hence her popularity!). Indications are that the word was very uncommon before about 1930, then revived as a nostalgic vogue word, in a period when everyone was...
by John Barton
Thu Jan 27, 2005 12:55 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: patteran / patrin
Replies: 4
Views: 3037

patteran / patrin

"A patteran is a coded configuration of leaves, sticks and stones left at the roadside by Gypsies to communicate with each other. ..."
Used by Arthur Ransome (in an illustration), name of a website, title of a 1931 book. So rather surprising not to find it in OneLook, etc.?
by John Barton
Wed Jan 26, 2005 11:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cartoon jargon
Replies: 5
Views: 4348

cartoon jargon

Words used to describe the conventions of comic strip drawing were around before Mort Walker wrote his 1964 article "Let's Get Down to Grawlixes" - a satirical spoof for the National Cartoonists' Society. In 1980, his "Lexicon of Comicana" virtually set in concrete many of the terms he invented, as ...
by John Barton
Sat Jan 15, 2005 7:57 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: monopoly
Replies: 10
Views: 4802

monopoly

I've heard several media attempts to introduce as sophistications 'dipoly' and 'tripoly', but they don't seem to catch on. Probably because of the accentuation on the second syllable.
by John Barton
Thu Jan 13, 2005 8:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Christmas vs. Xmas
Replies: 15
Views: 9209

Christmas vs. Xmas

There is evidence that several other colloquialisms commencing 'X' were current in the past, but didn't survive. In 'the Jealous Governes' [sic, the author being aged 8 and an indifferent speller], by Angela Ashford for example: "As we are passing the confectioners" said Mr.Hose to his wife, "we mig...
by John Barton
Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:46 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: the meanings of colours
Replies: 2
Views: 3295

the meanings of colours

A 'rival' site, but interesting, Hannah. I have a letter from the man who invented mauve, Sir William Henry Perkin, 1838 - 1907, in 1856.Invented the name, discovered the dye. A few decades ago, there was a vogue among the affected or manque distinctives, of pronouncing it 'morve'; considered distin...