Search found 1407 matches

by PhilHunt
Tue Jul 10, 2012 7:08 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Acrogen from Cornell
Replies: 3
Views: 3546

Acrogen from Cornell

A little free program that offers suggestions for acronyms based on word strings. A lot of fun can be had.

http://creativemachines.cornell.edu/acrogen

Got to thank Ken for pointing me in the direction of Cornell's site for this.
by PhilHunt
Tue Jul 10, 2012 7:04 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Newton's knocker / knock
Replies: 17
Views: 4724

Re: Newton's knocker / knock

Thanks Edwin, I think you're probably right. Not being familiar with Newgate's Knocker, I would have never made the connection. Unfortunately I will never know the truth.
by PhilHunt
Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:58 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Newton's knocker / knock
Replies: 17
Views: 4724

Newton's knocker / knock

Hello everyone. I've just come back from England after sadly visiting for a funeral. Whilst there I was discussing Isaac Newton with a relative when someone mentioned that the deceased had at times mentioned something called 'Newton's Knocker'. It was understood that Newton's Knocker was the door kn...
by PhilHunt
Thu Jun 14, 2012 12:00 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Teaching Reading
Replies: 29
Views: 14046

Re: Teaching Reading

Hello everyone. I'm sorry to take so long to reply to this thread, but what with work, family and unstable plate movement in the North or Italy, I've not had a chance till now. I must say that my wife and I have been following what Shelly and others suggested quite instinctively. We've been reading ...
by PhilHunt
Wed Apr 04, 2012 2:28 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Teaching Reading
Replies: 29
Views: 14046

Teaching Reading

I'm a teacher of English as a second language to adults, but I've never trained anyone to read from scratch, least of all a child. Now my son is 4 years old, he really wants to read. He already recognises some words (product names, car brands etc..) but he really wants to read books. He's not going ...
by PhilHunt
Wed Mar 21, 2012 8:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: strip: predication patterns (originally 'Crown' - moderator)
Replies: 11
Views: 1964

Re: Crown

I prefer...

"City Council strips and uncrowns Jennifer in lurid photo shock"

...for pure tabloid value.
by PhilHunt
Tue Mar 20, 2012 4:01 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Rhyming Stuff
Replies: 11
Views: 6594

Re: Rhyming Stuff

Isn't it just a case of meter or prosody?

I don't see how the examples you gave of 'the mangling of a sentence structure to allow a rhyme' are so very different from any other rhyming, beit song or verse. Could you be more specific as to what you mean by this 'mangling'?
by PhilHunt
Mon Mar 19, 2012 1:09 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Blade on a stick
Replies: 17
Views: 8899

Re: Blade on a stick

Wierdly enough, one of my students used the term 'blade on a stick' as a translation from an Italian expression. I can't quite remember the context now, but it was something like 'to wield power'.

Did you pluck that title out of thin air Bob, or does it have some meaning to you beyond a razor?
by PhilHunt
Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:57 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Plunge
Replies: 14
Views: 2370

Re: Plunge

Erik, you forgot to mention the possibility of the victim following the perpetrator home, forcing him off the road and shooting him in his car. THAT'S the American Way! Steve, in the UK, pushing someone under the water when they are already in the pool can be called 'dunking' and is usually good nat...
by PhilHunt
Fri Mar 09, 2012 9:24 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: eponym / eponymous
Replies: 38
Views: 54670

Re: eponym / eponymous

Anyway, it was Onan’s refusal to obey his father’s command that caused God to knock him off.
Where I come from, that could be understood as 'His father commanded Onan to have God bang the Bishop for him". This gives a whole new meaning to 'an interventional God'.
by PhilHunt
Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:33 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Dead Pan
Replies: 12
Views: 3911

Re: Dead Pan

An interesting discussion of ideas and reasonable thinking. The only hiccup with a word like pantomime being the origin is that the pan- in pantomime is a prefix: 1610s, "mime actor," from L. pantomimus "mime, dancer," from Gk. pantomimos "actor," lit. "imitator of all," from panto- (gen. of pan) "a...
by PhilHunt
Tue Mar 06, 2012 8:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Dead Pan
Replies: 12
Views: 3911

Re: Dead Pan

Thank you both. From what I understand Erik, the title of the poem is 'Dead Pan' even though it is not mentioned as such in the text of the poem itself. I was thinking that perhaps the popularity of a text could allow for its title to enter the language in the same way 'Catch-22' did, for example. A...
by PhilHunt
Tue Mar 06, 2012 5:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Dead Pan
Replies: 12
Views: 3911

Dead Pan

I don't think this has been covered in WW before. The term dead pan, as in "marked by or accomplished with a careful pretense of seriousness or calm detachment; impassive or expressionless: deadpan humor." quote from dictionary.com Etymonline says: deadpan 1928, from dead + pan in slang sense of "fa...
by PhilHunt
Wed Feb 22, 2012 8:01 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: History of English, prefix/suffix changes
Replies: 18
Views: 12978

Re: History of English, prefix/suffix changes

I actually thought Allen wrote 'Kindle Professors'... perhaps I'm dysxleczic
by PhilHunt
Wed Feb 22, 2012 6:21 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: History of English, prefix/suffix changes
Replies: 18
Views: 12978

Re: History of English, prefix/suffix changes

By 'prevalent', you do mean 'common in written documents of the time', don't you? We cannot really know what the common usage in the spoken language was. This could be a stylistic choice. However, I would still think it important to ask how the aux 'do' came about in the first place. It is easy to s...