Search found 1407 matches

by PhilHunt
Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:59 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Chomsky Lectures on-line
Replies: 2
Views: 3539

Chomsky Lectures on-line

For anyone interested, I found a link via the university of Arizona to a lecture by Noam Chomsky on "What is special about Language". For anyone who has ever wondered why Chomsky has such a reputation as a scholar, just watch this lecture. Raises alot of questions and covers a huge area of scholarly...
by PhilHunt
Fri Sep 21, 2012 3:00 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Hitler's use of language
Replies: 8
Views: 7077

Re: Hitler's use of language

Further reading...you might want to look at Italian Fascist language use. I read a book a while back about the use of the feminine in Italian Fascism which might contrast with the German Fatherland reading.
by PhilHunt
Fri Aug 24, 2012 1:09 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Favorite Genre of Shows?
Replies: 10
Views: 6058

Re: Favorite Genre of Shows?

Bobinwales wrote:I have not come across the word "ANIME" before.
Really showing your age there Bob ;)
by PhilHunt
Fri Aug 24, 2012 12:29 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Help for learning English
Replies: 4
Views: 1122

Re: Help for learning English

Hi Carol, I prepare students for the TOEFL exam every year. An excellent book to start with is Longmans Preperation Course ISBN 0-13-193290-x As for speaking, go on You Tube and search for TOEFL speaking examples and take note of which students score highly and which don't. You are correct that into...
by PhilHunt
Wed Jul 25, 2012 1:53 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: 'Fair weather friend' Antonym?
Replies: 8
Views: 10823

Re: 'Fair weather friend' Antonym?

I totally agree with you Erik that 'foul-weather-friend' would be the antonym of 'fair-weather' and would thus relate to people who gravitate around you when YOU are having a good or bad time, so it doesn't capture what I mean. Do you like my suggestion of 'bad-news-buddy'? I'm not sorrounded by the...
by PhilHunt
Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:58 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: 'Fair weather friend' Antonym?
Replies: 8
Views: 10823

Re: 'Fair weather friend' Antonym?

Thanks for those. The obvious antonym would seem to be 'bad weather friend' but your description, Erik, isn't exactly whate I mean. It's not really a parasitic friend as in someone who scrounges off you or takes advantage financially...I think it's probably best to give you a description. The scenar...
by PhilHunt
Tue Jul 24, 2012 8:25 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: 'Fair weather friend' Antonym?
Replies: 8
Views: 10823

'Fair weather friend' Antonym?

We're all familiar with the expression fair weather friend, but is there the antonym of this; someone who only sticks around or gets in contact in bad times or when they need help, but as soon as everything's settled, leave?

I seem to have a higher proportion of the latter in my life.
by PhilHunt
Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:28 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Newton's knocker / knock
Replies: 17
Views: 4724

Re: Newton's knocker / knock

With all respect Tony, I think I may not have made myself very clear. I did not mean to say 'knocker', in reference to a person, was not used, only that it was relatively low in the order of usage; in other words, a knocker is not always someone who knocks on doors. Furthermore, I am not contradicti...
by PhilHunt
Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: run/draw a bath
Replies: 25
Views: 8823

Re: run/draw a bath

I think Woz's missing phrase is 'from a tap', as in 'I run water from a tap into a bath'. I disagree Allen. The use of 'run' in connection with 'water' is much older than the tap. Though valve systems and redirectioning of water currents goes back into ancient history, the idea of water flowing int...
by PhilHunt
Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Newton's knocker / knock
Replies: 17
Views: 4724

Re: Newton's knocker / knock

A knocker was always : someone who knocks on doors. Except, of course, for knocker-uppers who knocked on windows. If that were the case, I would assume there would be some evidence to back up that assumption. In most dictionaries this definition falls low in the classifications. knocker (ˈnɒkə) — n...
by PhilHunt
Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: run/draw a bath
Replies: 25
Views: 8823

Re: run/draw a bath

...the economy into the ground.
by PhilHunt
Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: run/draw a bath
Replies: 25
Views: 8823

Re: run/draw a bath

What about the interesting missing element in the utterance: "The prawn cocktail on table seven wants his check." ;) What I failed to mention Edwin is that the missing element is included when not obvious. For example: "I'm so thirsty/hungry! Give me a bucket of water/a yard of ale/a tray of scones/...
by PhilHunt
Thu Jul 12, 2012 3:06 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: run/draw a bath
Replies: 25
Views: 8823

Re: run/draw a bath

If I may interject in this discussion. When we go to a coffee shop and say "May I have a coffee" what is omitted but implicitly implied is 'a cup of' . It is omitted because, in our culture, it is generally accepted that the coffee comes in a cup and not, say, a bath. If I could extend this argument...
by PhilHunt
Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:37 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Acrogen from Cornell
Replies: 3
Views: 3546

Re: Acrogen from Cornell

Oh well, blame Ken for sending me to that page ;)
by PhilHunt
Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:36 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Newton's knocker / knock
Replies: 17
Views: 4724

Re: Newton's knocker / knock

It was always understood by the family to refer to the door knocker on a jail, so I think Edwin is nearer the mark. While googling, I saw Newton's Knocker/Cradle that you mentioned, but this was never the context. Thanks anyway.