Search found 397 matches

by haro
Wed Apr 12, 2006 8:00 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: vire
Replies: 6
Views: 2136

vire

Jeff, just like 'vire' in English, as mentioned above by Ken, 'virer' and virement' had been around in French quite a few centuries before telegraphs were introduced. And if you look at the way the word 'vires' as the plural of Latin 'vis' (meaning a force) is pronounced in English, you'll quickly d...
by haro
Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:55 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tattoo
Replies: 15
Views: 2324

tattoo

Russ, apart from the fact that there are many very different Polynesian tattooing techniques, what you saw is very similar to what was used in Tahiti. And I fully agree to the tap-tap-tapping sound. But what makes the 'too'?! Is that the scream uttered by the victim? Ken, I think that was one big mi...
by haro
Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:38 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: chronological
Replies: 8
Views: 1345

chronological

Edwin, funny you mentioned that. Remember there may be a connection indeed? See http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?t=18390 .
by haro
Mon Apr 10, 2006 12:35 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: chronological
Replies: 8
Views: 1345

chronological

Ngozi, it's the old question: Which came first, the hen or the egg? In Greek (Ancient and Modern), 'chrónos' means 'time.' I guess no one really knows whether Chrónos, the personification of time in the Ancient Greek mythological curiosity cabinet, was named after the simple word or the other way ro...
by haro
Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:49 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tattoo
Replies: 15
Views: 2324

tattoo

Che, as I told Harry, the totally different origins of the two term can be looked up in dictionaries such as Merriam-Webster Online. Since the intransitive verb, meaning to drum, rap, comes from Dutch 'tap toe,' which means 'tap shut' or 'lid closed,' a connection to a Tahitian word with a meaning a...
by haro
Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1369

windlass

Given the displacement, beam and righting moment of my boat, Phil's suggestion would need a more overweight sweetheart on the outrigger than mine to be effective, but I'm not trading her in just for technical reasons. She does have virtues that weigh more.
by haro
Wed Apr 05, 2006 11:36 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tattoo
Replies: 15
Views: 2324

tattoo

Harry, there's no connection indeed. The former is of Dutch origin whereas the latter is Tahitian. Half a planet in between. Please go to http://www.m-w.com and enter tattoo to read some more details.
by haro
Wed Apr 05, 2006 5:36 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1369

windlass

Yes tony, it really is. It also makes you see your own first language from a different viewing angle. And you'll learn that most people firmly believe their own native language is the one that spells words the way they are pronounced and vice versa, no matter what language. There are languages with ...
by haro
Mon Apr 03, 2006 10:06 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: triquarterly
Replies: 11
Views: 2280

triquarterly

My thought at first sight was, 'published once in nine months' - and after having given it some more pondering, I'm still sticking to that. It may be a somewhat extravagant schedule, but that's their problem, not ours. Anyhow, 'triennial' is something that occurs once in three years, a 'trimonthly' ...
by haro
Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1369

windlass

Tony, what I mean is the fact that, apart from a few exceptions, native English speakers feel free to pronounce foreign words as if they were plain English, especially the vowels, whereas in other languages, native speakers usually try to adopt the original pronunciation as closely as possible witho...
by haro
Sat Apr 01, 2006 2:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1369

windlass

Captain, as a non-native English speaker usually not sailing waters around or in English speaking countries I always thought the 'wind' part of 'windlass' was pronounced like the one in 'winding tackle.' Sounded kind of logical, didn't it? At the tender age of 51, however, after getting in very clos...
by haro
Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:50 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Word usage question....
Replies: 11
Views: 2517

Word usage question....

Depending on where you live, it's either 'maneuver' or 'manœuvre.'
by haro
Thu Mar 30, 2006 8:37 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Mandolin and violin
Replies: 21
Views: 5799

Mandolin and violin

The traditional Greek bouzouki is based on the Turkish saz. The term 'bouzouki' most likely was derived from Turkish 'bozouk saz,' which, according to sources whose reliability I cannot judge, literally means 'broken saz,' meaning a smaller (actually medium-sized) saz. The traditional bouzouki has t...
by haro
Wed Mar 29, 2006 5:25 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: The unbearable truth
Replies: 7
Views: 2091

The unbearable truth

Erik, that's why I posted her remark. After all, she's a writer and feature journalist, however, she keeps spelling it that way, while I, of course, keep teasing the heck out of her. Same with 'lying down' instead of 'laying down,' let alone 'lain' and the like.
by haro
Wed Mar 29, 2006 5:14 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Mandolin and violin
Replies: 21
Views: 5799

Mandolin and violin

Bob, maybe it wasn't a typo. The term 'bazouki' can be found fairly often too, mainly on Web sites written in English. No idea where that spelling comes from. In Greece, where I lived almost two years, and in modern Greek I've never heard or read it. There it always is 'bouzouki.'