Search found 397 matches

by haro
Mon May 08, 2006 7:46 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: "in the name of"
Replies: 9
Views: 2095

"in the name of"

Jil, as I wrote, I don't know anything about Hebrew, but the original language of the New Testament was Greek. I guess much of the 'In the name of...' business got into modern languages from there, but I must admit that's an assumption of mine. The two possible Greek translations I mentioned are lit...
by haro
Mon May 08, 2006 12:22 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: "in the name of"
Replies: 9
Views: 2095

"in the name of"

Jil, I assume you don't want to know the meaning but the translation; right? 'In the name...' in ancient Greek is 'eis to ónoma...' It's a bit tricky in that the rest must be in the genitive form, and, besides that, the article must also have the correct gender (of three). It's not like English, whe...
by haro
Sat May 06, 2006 8:02 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bloody vs sodding
Replies: 31
Views: 4683

bloody vs sodding

Ken, now that's what I call hands-on physics!
by haro
Sat May 06, 2006 5:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bloody vs sodding
Replies: 31
Views: 4683

bloody vs sodding

Gentlemen, I knew I was triggering some highly scientific debate. The perpetuum mobile approach mentioned by Erik was discussed on various Internet forums too, with undetermined outcome. I can't remember having seen Erik's copper coil version elsewhere, though. Too bad he mentioned it on this public...
by haro
Fri May 05, 2006 11:36 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bloody vs sodding
Replies: 31
Views: 4683

bloody vs sodding

Ken, as a physicist you may remember the levitation device consisting of a buttered slice of bread strapped on the back of a cat, buttered side up, of course. The experiment is started by dropping the cat-cum-bread apparatus. Since the cat will always land on its feet but Sod's Law demands that the ...
by haro
Fri May 05, 2006 9:12 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: what does this mean?
Replies: 8
Views: 1373

what does this mean?

Cleopatra, welcome to the gang.

The origin of the word 'Greek' was covered here: http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?t=18497
by haro
Fri May 05, 2006 12:43 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: brands used for general items
Replies: 10
Views: 2302

brands used for general items

I'm not sure if Margarine was used as a tradename. Details of its history can be read here: http://webexhibits.org/butter/margarine-history.html
by haro
Fri Apr 28, 2006 10:06 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Off-topic addendum to OED thread
Replies: 20
Views: 4858

Off-topic addendum to OED thread

Don't worry. There is kind of a balance. Some things may come too early, others come way too late. Windows 95 was launched in 1996. The new Windows, now called Vista, was scheduled for 2004, then postponed time and again. In early 2006, Billy-Boy said it will hit the shelves before Christmas 2006 fo...
by haro
Thu Apr 27, 2006 9:23 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Hey Prescott
Replies: 9
Views: 1446

Hey Prescott

gdwdwrkr, 'hey presto' even has a Merriam-Webster Online entry, and the origin of 'presto' is correctly detailed in the 'presto' entry. Shelley may be right; so far I've hardly ever heard it in the USA but fairly often in the UK. And, by the way, your pretty impressive Google hit figures obviously w...
by haro
Tue Apr 25, 2006 12:32 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Suri .. what's in a name ?
Replies: 15
Views: 2203

Suri .. what's in a name ?

Rolls Royce had to be told that Silver Mist would not sell well in German speaking countries, where 'Mist' means manure - or 'shit,' if used as an interjection. Web sites covering this story differ very much on the year when it allegedly happened. Any time between the 'fifties and the 'eighties can ...
by haro
Tue Apr 18, 2006 11:35 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Occam's razor
Replies: 17
Views: 3087

Occam's razor

Occam's Razor is often quoted as, "Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem," which means, "Matters shouldn't be complicated beyond necessity," a.k.a. "Keep it simple, stupid." However, that sentence cannot be found in the surviving works of William of Ockham, who was a 14th century logicia...
by haro
Mon Apr 17, 2006 7:35 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: open access to OED one week only
Replies: 41
Views: 6391

open access to OED one week only

Artistic license.
by haro
Mon Apr 17, 2006 10:18 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: A wordy joke
Replies: 3
Views: 2189

A wordy joke

Here they are called weather theologists.
by haro
Sun Apr 16, 2006 2:16 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Solace
Replies: 19
Views: 3921

Solace

I was sure that 'u' would be brought up. In American English, 'Glamour' seems to be the only '-our' noun that is acceptable, except, of course, 'Labour' when talking about Tony Blair's party. Too off topic, I know; 'glamour' has its own thread in the archives.
by haro
Fri Apr 14, 2006 8:59 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: funny bone
Replies: 6
Views: 3988

funny bone

According to my Schweizerdeutsches Idiotikon , an etymological dictionary of Swiss Alemannic (printed 1806), southern German dialects including Alemannic used the term 'Narrenbein' ('fool's bone') for funny bone already 200 years ago. Since German never uses the word 'humerus' except in very medical...