Search found 28 matches

by sandx
Wed Jun 15, 2005 3:29 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boo
Replies: 38
Views: 12209

boo

David Crystal,who has written 40 books on language, states in his encyclopedia that `This 150 years,was the dark age in the history of the language` and that` judging by the documents which have survived,it seems that French was the language of government,law,administration,literature and the Church...
by sandx
Mon Jun 13, 2005 9:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boo
Replies: 38
Views: 12209

boo

Erik,I do not consider myself `mis-informed`.I think if you took time to read the 41/2 lines you base your condemnation on,you will note that what I was saying is perfectly true. The language of england was almost exclusively french.(obviously not modern french).After the Norman conquests,so called,...
by sandx
Sun Jun 12, 2005 5:37 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Chatspeak stole my internet!
Replies: 50
Views: 19398

Chatspeak stole my internet!

I totally agree with you,PW. Written language, purely as a rapid means of communication,is not new. We have had shorthand for many years. Does anyone still use it?
Sloppy careless writing and speech,now that is something else.
by sandx
Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:09 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Great Britain
Replies: 25
Views: 12827

Great Britain

This topic has always confused me, as someone not from...where you're at...as to whether I should use "Great Britain", "The UK", "Britain", "England", or "The British Isles" and what exactly I was including and referring to in saying it. I'm fully ignorant about the history of the region, mainly be...
by sandx
Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:02 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: New Twists on Famous Phrases
Replies: 9
Views: 10785

New Twists on Famous Phrases

Tempus fidget - the time a kid has to spend in the waiting-room
by sandx
Sun Jun 12, 2005 8:45 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boo
Replies: 38
Views: 12209

boo

Russ, the fact that the word became popular in those circles doesn't necessarily mean it was imported by them. It may have been around much longer without having surfaced in printed form to be listed in dictionaries. The example you mentioned, for instance, contains a French word that got into Engl...
by sandx
Sat Jun 11, 2005 1:29 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: THE
Replies: 26
Views: 11136

THE

To Spiritus who quoted Goethe's bon mots to wit: "Those who know nothing of foreign languages, knows nothing of their own" why not in the original German I ask? Mon repos c'est suivant: Je ne comprend pas : Francois. Naturellement la langue Francois est difficile. In which way was there not a point...
by sandx
Sat Jun 11, 2005 8:58 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: "By the dog of Eygpt!" (Huh?)
Replies: 2
Views: 2852

"By the dog of Eygpt!" (Huh?)

"You cannot be Sirius!" Interesting questions,Spiritus. Anubis was the creature,human with a jackals head but generally now referred to as a dog. His job was to transport the souls of the dead to the infernal judge.He presided over the scales that weighed the hearts of the dead,when they were brough...
by sandx
Sat Jun 11, 2005 8:32 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: love handles
Replies: 3
Views: 5202

love handles

Here in France they have the same expression,`des poignees d`amour`. I don`t remember it in the UK before I came to live in France (16 years)
by sandx
Sat Jun 11, 2005 8:11 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: double superlatives
Replies: 14
Views: 6334

double superlatives

There was a range of memorabilia which bore the legend `Elvis Live`s`. I don`t know if they`ve spotted the mistake yet!
by sandx
Fri Jun 10, 2005 1:02 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Some difference
Replies: 5
Views: 4377

Some difference

It is a superstition in the mould of "never split an infinitive" and "never end a sentence with a preposition" to say that "different to" is incorrect and only "different from" should be used. The 1965 editions of both Fowler's "Dictionary of Modern English Usage" and Partridge's "Usage and abusage...
by sandx
Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:45 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boo
Replies: 38
Views: 12209

boo

cementer wrote:
What is the origin of the expression boo - as an affectionate name for a loved one?
An abbreviation of Bootiful?
by sandx
Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:42 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: freshmen
Replies: 3
Views: 2191

freshmen

Can anyone tell me where the names for classes come from? Why are students called freshmen, sophmores, juniors and seniors? A teacher told my class to find out and I don't know where to look. eljay Freshman; Old english word,for someone at college,who hadn`t been `salted`. New students had to pass ...
by sandx
Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Great Britain
Replies: 25
Views: 12827

Great Britain

Wizard of Oz wrote: .. English ?? .. British ?? .. they're bloody to and froms mate ..

WoZ of Aus 09/06/05

Are they? I thought the poms were only english.
by sandx
Thu Jun 09, 2005 12:25 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)
Replies: 9
Views: 6753

gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)

Sandy, where did you find the word "cwimlam"? I can find only four words in Welsh where an "i" follows a "w" (both are vowels), and cwimlam isn't one of them. I am a rotten Welsh speaker, but my dictionaries are very good. Hi Bob,it`s from one of my older text books. Brewers (1894)Cwim -round (that...