Search found 3531 matches

by Phil White
Sat Nov 21, 2020 7:13 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: hospital corners
Replies: 18
Views: 2527

Re: hospital corners

What is worse, Erik, posting instructions on folding hospital corners or (presumably) reading the post and then posting the link in order to moan about the person who posted it in the first place?

What worries me is how you found it in the first place...
by Phil White
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:32 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Rudi Giuliani
Replies: 1
Views: 178

Rudi Giuliani

Watching Rudi Giuliani's hair dye failure on TV tonight reminded me of something ...

Giuliani took it straight from the screenplay of Death in Venice:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deUVrtC5_So

What a wonderful film that was!
by Phil White
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Run a red light
Replies: 5
Views: 241

Re: Run a red light

I think Steven probably meant to write "are you sick of life?" in 2. I think it would be more normal to say "are you tired of life?" or "are you tired of living?", and that could well be appropriate in such a situation. For me, I would probably drive up the road a little, then stop and light up a pi...
by Phil White
Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:58 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: too good
Replies: 5
Views: 269

Re: too good

For me as a Brit, "too good of a person" is simply too much of a good thing.
by Phil White
Wed Nov 18, 2020 5:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: too good
Replies: 5
Views: 269

Re: too good

The only way of using the construction that I can think of is in the singular:
"He is too good a person to do something like that."

Logically, the construction should also work in the plural as well, but it doesn't.
by Phil White
Sat Nov 14, 2020 3:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Roger
Replies: 6
Views: 609

Re: Roger

I for one would certainly never roger a family member...
by Phil White
Wed Nov 11, 2020 9:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Absent-minded
Replies: 5
Views: 451

Re: Absent-minded

"Forgettery" has been an established part of my own vocabulary since I first heard it about 15 years ago, but I would only ever use it as part of a humorous comment.

If you intend to use it as a joke, sentence 1 is fine. If you intend it as a serious comment, sentence 2 is better.
by Phil White
Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: the chances of
Replies: 1
Views: 286

Re: the chances of

In speech, and in most informal writing, we would almost certainly employ some form of ellipsis: The chances of A happening are greater than all the rest combined. The chances of A happening are greater than those of all the rest combined. Pretty well anything that is more grammatically complete sou...
by Phil White
Mon Nov 09, 2020 11:25 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Now and again.
Replies: 3
Views: 409

Re: Now and again.

Bobinwales wrote: Sat Nov 07, 2020 11:46 pm Trump supporters are complaining that people are dressing up as elks to taunt them after the election result.
Don't pay any attention, it is fake gnus.
That may have been the most groanworthy of all the posts I have ever seen on Wordwizard. Well done, Bob!
by Phil White
Sat Nov 07, 2020 2:14 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Muffler vs Scarf
Replies: 3
Views: 422

Re: Muffler vs Scarf

As Erik said, "muffler" is very much an American term. You will very rarely hear it in the UK and most people would not understand it. For us, the only word is a "scarf".
by Phil White
Fri Nov 06, 2020 3:33 pm
Forum: Welcome to the Clubhouse
Topic: Recent site outage
Replies: 1
Views: 801

Recent site outage

Recent updates to the servers with our host led to problems with the Wordwizard site, with none of you being able to post anything. I have now upgraded the board software, but have not yet got round to updating the style. I hope to get things back to normal in a few days, but until then everything s...
by Phil White
Fri Oct 23, 2020 4:23 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Dodge to be
Replies: 5
Views: 1284

Re: Dodge to be

Is it just me, or does using "doctor" (change in order to deceive) in a statement about something medical seem to somehow detract from the statement? I immediately thought there was some (attempt at) humour injected in there and questioned how serious the statement was. For some reason, I would not...
by Phil White
Wed Oct 21, 2020 12:52 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: fairly shook
Replies: 1
Views: 779

Re: fairly shook

a) is fine, but b) makes no sense to me. As far as the meaning is concerned, it is not easy to pin down. The closest I can get is something like "literally": The walls fairly/literally shook. He fairly/literally screamed with delight. Historically, I think the meaning is something like "in the prope...
by Phil White
Wed Oct 21, 2020 12:43 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: rather
Replies: 1
Views: 787

Re: rather

It depends how the sentence is delivered. This usage of "rather" is often very complex. In many cases, it is a heavily understated way of saying that the apples are extremely tasty. This applies, for instance, when the adjective has a positive connotation, as in this case. Depending on context, it c...
by Phil White
Mon Oct 19, 2020 5:56 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Alexander-esque moment
Replies: 4
Views: 1520

Re: Alexander-esque moment

The quote you have given is from an article entitled "Alexander And The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day". That is the title of a 1982 children's book by author Judith Viorst. Disney has now made a film with the same name. In both the book and the film, the title character, Alexander, suffe...