Search found 3314 matches

by Phil White
Sun Aug 25, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: compared to
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: compared to

Solutions similar to Erik's were what occurred to me. I would merely add that there are many who still insist on "compared with" in preference to "compared to". It is also my own preference, but the usual argument in favour of "compared with", namely that the prefix "com- / con-" means "with", is pr...
by Phil White
Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Vision
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: Vision

A common idiom for this is "clouded your judgement".
by Phil White
Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: get vs. force
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Re: get vs. force

Sentence a is okay. You are right about c and d, for the reason you give. But you could use a "to" infinitive: c. They want to force their son out of the family nest to earn his own living. d. They want to force their son out of the family nest to earn his own living. The meaning is, however, slight...
by Phil White
Thu Aug 22, 2019 9:14 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: kidnapped him to
Replies: 1
Views: 78

Re: kidnapped him to

Interesting.

4 does not really work. The others are fine, but I guess you figured that out for yourself.

The reason is that in sentence 4, the notional subject of "make" (they) is completely missing as a result of using "kidnap" in the passive.
by Phil White
Thu Aug 22, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bossed by one's girlfriend
Replies: 5
Views: 186

Re: Bossed by one's girlfriend

"A boy with a girlfriend" is synonymous with "a boy who is bossed around by his girlfriend".
by Phil White
Thu Aug 22, 2019 8:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: such as
Replies: 2
Views: 96

Re: such as

It's exactly the same distinction as with the defining / non-defining relative clause. If you use the commas, the "such as Joyce and Faulkner" is parenthetical. Otherwise it is restrictive. With the commas: All great novelists use the interior monologue. Joyce and Faulkner are examples of great nove...
by Phil White
Thu Aug 22, 2019 8:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: exist only in fairy tales
Replies: 1
Views: 87

Re: exist only in fairy tales

All three sentences really need the "such", but it can also be placed before the "as": " They arrested us with brutality such as one can hardly imagine."

They are all, however, extremely formal and belong to written rather than spoken English.
by Phil White
Mon Aug 19, 2019 10:10 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: solace and consolation
Replies: 5
Views: 185

Re: solace and consolation

According to the Wiktionary, and in this case, it sounds plausible to me, the Latin verb solor ( solari ) has the following etymology: From Proto-Indo-European * sōlh₂ - (“mercy, comfort”). Cognate with Ancient Greek ἱλάσκομαι ( hiláskomai , “to appease”),[1] Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌻𐍃 ( sēls , “good, kind”), Old ...
by Phil White
Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: who we found out
Replies: 1
Views: 145

Re: who we found out

This is a particularly ugly example of a double relative clause. Sentence 1 sounds OK. In sentence 4, the "him" at the end is entirely lost. Sentences 2 and 3 really illustrate why this is a particularly ugly specimen. The "whom" is simply wrong. "Jack" is not the object of "found out". The object, ...
by Phil White
Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:30 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Small hinges swing big doors
Replies: 17
Views: 8099

Re: Small hinges swing big doors

To be notified of replies, check the box "Notify me when a reply is posted" below the Submit button. This setting is then remembered for all future posts. Yes. It seems that the concept was around in the mid-19th century. I found a couple: "On such little hinges of law do the great gates hang..." ("...
by Phil White
Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:55 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: the young people/young people
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Re: the young people/young people

Grammatically, they are all fine. They are all generalizations (with or without the article). The generalization is stronger with the article, but is never taken to imply that all young people behave in the same way. If you were to dissect the sentences far too finely, 1 and 3 would mean that "the p...
by Phil White
Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:45 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Brexit explained: A layperson's guide
Replies: 13
Views: 4847

Re: Brexit explained: A layperson's guide

Phil is considering whether to close the thread... Despite having strong views on the issue and despite never having felt constrained to hide my opinions on Wordwizard, and despite the fact that I welcome discussion, light-hearted or otherwise on subjects other than language on the site, I chose not...
by Phil White
Sat Aug 03, 2019 10:22 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Husky and Hoarse
Replies: 7
Views: 914

Re: Husky and Hoarse

Raspy: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Raspel_Baiter.jpg/1280px-Raspel_Baiter.jpg By Simon A. Eugster - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0 Husky: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c4/E8025-Milyanfan-corn-huskers.jpg/1024px-E8025-Milyanfan-corn-huskers.jpg By Vmenk...
by Phil White
Fri Aug 02, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Husky and Hoarse
Replies: 7
Views: 914

Re: Husky and Hoarse

by Phil White
Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:09 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: aside from
Replies: 3
Views: 845

Re: aside from

Hmmmmm. "Aside from", "apart from", "besides". As far as I see it, "besides" always carries the meaning "in addition to". "Apart from" and "aside from" both seem to be able to carry both meanings, namely "except for" and "in addition to", depending on context. My intuition tells me that "apart from"...